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Office of Public Affairs, Assembly Series Lectures (WUA00063)

Overview

Scope and Contents

Administrative Information

Detailed Description

Assembly Series Lectures

Assembly Series Lectures

Assembly Series Lectures

Assembly Series Lectures

Assembly Series Lectures

Assembly Series Lectures

Assembly Series Lectures



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Office of Public Affairs, Assembly Series Lectures (WUA00063), 1949-2015 | WUA University Archives

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Collection Overview

Title: Office of Public Affairs, Assembly Series Lectures (WUA00063), 1949-2015Add to your cart.

ID: WUA/01/wua00063

Primary Creator: Assembly Series Office - Washington University in St. Louis

Extent: 0.0

Arrangement: The collection is arranged chronologically.

Languages: English

Scope and Contents of the Materials

This collection contains recordings of the Assembly Series Lectures. Topics of the lectures vary widely.

Recordings are listed by Assembly Series Lecture (ASL) number-- a unique identifier-- then by speaker name and lecture title. The physical format of the recording is noted in brackets. Because of the large size of this collection recordings are described in separate finding aids.

Digital copies of certain lectures from the later 2000s are available for research. These digital materials are only available to be reviewed in the University Archives Reading Room. Please contact the University Archives for more information.

A printed guide to lectures from 1949 - Spring 1991 is also available; see Checklist of Video & Sound Recordings in the Department of Special Collections, available in Archives and in the circulating collection of Olin Library.

Collection Historical Note

For a half century, the Washington University Assembly Series has brought some of the most important voices in contemporary society to campus. The lectures, which represent a broad range of topics designed to complement the University's curriculum, are free and open to the public.

Support for the lecture series comes from Student Union and the University, as well as from other student groups, academic departments, and schools.

Administrative Information

Repository: WUA University Archives

Accruals: Accruals are interfiled.

Access Restrictions: This collection has some restrictions; please contact the University Archivist (314) 935-9730.

Use Restrictions:

Users of the collection must read and agree to abide by the rules and procedures set forth in the Materials Use Policies.

Providing access to materials does not constitute permission to publish or otherwise authorize use. All publication not covered by fair use or other exceptions is restricted to those who have permission of the copyright holder, which may or may not be Washington University.

If you wish to publish or license Special Collections materials, please contact Special Collections to inquire about copyright status at (314) 935-5495 or spec@wumail.wustl.edu. (Publish means quotation in whole or in part in seminar or term papers, theses or dissertations, journal articles, monographs, books, digital forms, photographs, images, dramatic presentations, transcriptions, or any other form prepared for a limited or general public.)

Acquisition Method: Recordings are transferred to University Archives by staff from the Office of Public Affairs on an ongoing basis.

Preferred Citation: [Item description]. From the [collection title, series, box, folder]. University Archives, Washington University in St. Louis.

Processing Information: Processed by University Archives Staff. Material is continually added to this collection and is processed as it is received.

Finding Aid Revision History:

Collection finding aid reviewed and updated for XML encoding by Archives staff in 2010.

This finding aid was entered into Archon by Meg Tuomala in November 2012.


Box and Folder Listing


Browse by Series:

[Series 1: Assembly Series Lectures, 1949-1959],
[Series 2: Assembly Series Lectures, 1960-1969],
[Series 3: Assembly Series Lectures, 1970-1979],
[Series 4: Assembly Series Lectures, 1980-1989],
[Series 5: Assembly Series Lectures, 1990-1999],
[Series 6: Assembly Series Lectures, 2000-2009],
[Series 7: Assembly Series Lectures, 2010-2015],
[All]

Series 7: Assembly Series Lectures, 2010-2015Add to your cart.
Folder 1: ASL2010-01Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file and 1 CD
Item 1: Reinventing Fire: The Profitable Transition from Oil and Coal to Efficiency and Renewables, January 27, 2010Add to your cart.
Speaker: Amory Lovins; Sponsor: Arthur Holly Compton Lecture; Named Lecture: Arthur Holly Compton Lecture; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: Deemed by many as an environmental visionary, Lovins has advocated for finding and using alternative energy sources for more than three decades. As cofounder, chair and chief scientist of the Rocky Mountain Institute, a leading environmental think tank, he is widely recognized as one of the world's premiere authorities on energy conservation and innovation.
Folder 2: ASL2010-02Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file and 1 CD
Item 1: Skandalaris Center's Olin Cup Competition Keynote, February 4, 2010Add to your cart.
Speaker: Robert Freling; Sponsor: Engineers Without Borders and Skandalaris Center; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: Few things are more essential to the estimated two billion people living in the developing world than access to clean, affordable electricity. Robert Freling, executive director of SELF - the Solar Electric Light Fund - has made it his mission to deliver clean, renewable electricity to villagers around the world.
Folder 3: ASL2010-03Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file and 1 CD
Item 1: From Dayton to Dover: A Brief History of the Evolution Teaching Controversy in the U.S., February 10, 2010Add to your cart.
Speaker: Edward Larson; Sponsor: Thomas Hall Lecture; Named Lecture: Thomas Hall Lecture; Location: Louderman, Room 458; Notes: Historian and Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Edward Larson's books, which mainly deal with evolution and the current and historical conflicts between science and religion, are regarded as both scholarly and highly readable for the general population.
Folder 4: ASL2010-05Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file and 1 CD
Item 1: Weeping Statues and Bleeding Bread: Miracles and their Theorists, February 22, 2010Add to your cart.
Speaker: Caroline Bynum; Sponsor: Interdisciplinary Project in the Humanities (IPH); Named Lecture: Interdisciplinary Project in the Humanities Lecture; Location: Women's Building Lounge; Notes: Throughout her distinguished career, medieval historian Caroline Bynum has been examining the language, imagery and concept of identity in texts of the European Middle Ages.
Folder 5: ASL2010-06Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file and  1 CD
Item 1: What Are You? The Changing Face of America, March 2, 2010Add to your cart.
Speaker: Kip Fulbeck; Sponsor: Association of Mixed Students and Missouri History Museum; Named Lecture: Association of Mixed Students Lecture; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: Kip Fulbeck uses art, film, photographs and words to explore the meaning of racial identity for those whose ethnic backgrounds do not fit into one, neat category. Fulbeck's own mixed heritage is Cantonese, English, Irish and Welsh, which qualifies him for the term "Hapa," the once derogatory slang word for "half," as in half Asian or Pacific Islander. One of his most lasting contributions to the national discussion on race and identity is the Hapa Project, an exhibition (and book) featuring more than 1,200 portraits. Portions of Fulbeck's Hapa Project are displayed in the Missouri History Museum's new exhibition, "RACE: Are We So Different?" which runs through April 4. The museum is co-sponsoring Fulbeck's talk, "What Are You? The Changing Face of America," at 5 p.m. March 2 in Graham Chapel. At 7 p.m. March 5, Fulbeck will appear at the museum.
Folder 6: ASL2010-07Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file and 1 CD
Item 1: Matisyahu: Unplugged, an unscripted conversation about music, philosophy, and religion, March 18, 2010,Add to your cart.
Speaker: Matisyahu; Sponsor: Jewish Student Union and St. Louis Hillel and Congress of the South 40, Chabad on campus, Congregation b'nai amoona; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: Acclaimed singer/songwriter Matisyahu will make a special appearance at Washington University at 4 p.m. March 18 in Graham Chapel. The program will feature an acoustic performance as well as a discussion about his development as an artist, his latest record, "Light," and the fusion of his philosophies and various musical styles. Matisyahu is a cultural icon, whose unique blend of Hasidic, reggae and hip-hop music has sold millions of records and garnered fans around the world. Seating will be limited.
Folder 7: ASL2010-08Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file and 1 CD
Item 1: The Present and Future of Capitalism, March 24, 2010Add to your cart.
Speaker: Naomi Klein;  Sponsor: Chancellor's Fellows Lecture; Named Lecture: Chancellor's Fellows Lecture; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: Since writing the 2000 best seller "No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies" and following it up with the explosive and equally popular 2007 book "Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism," Naomi Klein has become a symbol for the anti-globalization movement. Klein's talk, "The Present and Future of Capitalism," will be the Chancellor's Fellows Lecture at 11 a.m. March 24 in Graham Chapel. The discussion will continue at 2 p.m. with a panel in the Women's Building Lounge.
Folder 8: ASL2010-09Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file and 1 CD
Item 1: Common Sense, Common Knowledge, March, 29, 2010Add to your cart.
Speaker: Common; Sponsor: Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Lecture co sponsored by Association of Black Students and Student Union; Notes: CD 100329
Folder 9: ASL2010-10Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file and 1 CD
Item 1: CEO The Mission Continues: Inspiring Leadership in Challenging Times, March 30, 2010Add to your cart.
Speaker: Eric Greitens; Sponsor: Gephardt Institute for Public Service and Skandalaris Center for Entrepreneurial Studies; Named Lecture: Thomas C. Hennings Memorial Lecture; Location: Brown Hall, Room 118; Notes: Greitens is a highly-decorated veteran and humanitarian who has established a center in St. Louis that assists wounded veterans in finding leadership opportunities in community service
Folder 10: ASL2010-11Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file and 1 CD
Item 1: William Harvey: Enigmatic Aristotelian of the Scientific Revolution, April 7, 2010Add to your cart.
Speaker: James Lennox; Sponsor: Biggs Lecture in the Classics; Named Lecture: James and Penelope Biggs Lecture in the Classics; Location: Simon Hall, May Auditorium; Notes: James Lennox is a historian and philosopher of science. A preeminent scholar in the field of Aristotle's philosophy and biology, he is also an expert on Darwin and contemporary philosophy of biology.
Folder 11: ASL2010-12Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file and 1 CD
Item 1: Sex Trafficking and the New Abolitionists, April 12, 2010Add to your cart.
Speaker: Gloria Steinem; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: For nearly half a century, Steinem has been at the forefront of the women's rights movement in America. Her influence on American culture has been far-reaching and included the creation of Ms. Magazine and Take Your Daughter to Work Day. More recently, her advocacy has focused on the global sex trade problem, which will be the subject of her lecture, "Sex Trafficking and the New Abolitionists."
Folder 12: ASL2010-13Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file and 1 CD
Item 1: Mentoring Matters, April 15, 2010Add to your cart.
Speaker: Nancy Giles; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: Since 2003, Nancy Giles has been delivering smart and witty social commentaries on everything from Barack Obama's presidency to Janet Jackson's "wardrobe malfunction" on "CBS Sunday Morning." Giles is also a veteran of the famous improvisation troupe Second City, has acted in a number of films and television series, and has written and performed solo pieces for the stage.
Folder 13: ASL2010-14Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file and  1 CD
Item 1: An Emerging Tick-borne Disease in the Central United States: Human Monocytic Ehrlichiosis, April 20, 2010Add to your cart.
Speaker: Robert Thach; Sponsor: Phi Beta Kappa / Sigma Xi;  Named Lecture: Phi Beta Kappa / Sigma Xi Lecture; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: WUSTL biologist Robert Thach will reflect on his current work which seeks to understand the ecology and epidemiology of vector-borne illnesses associated with ticks.
Folder 14: ASL2010-15Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file and 1 CD
Item 1: Bodies I Have in Mind: Adapting Ancient Texts for the Stage, April 21, 2010Add to your cart.
Speaker: Mary Zimmerman; Sponsor: WU Women's Society; Named Lecture: Women's Society Lecture / Helen Clanton Morrin Lecture; Location: Edison Theater; Notes: Tony award winning playwright and director Mary Zimmerman possesses a love for literature, as many of her theatrical works on stage can attest. Zimmerman will be here for the Performing Arts Department's staging of "Metamorphoses."
Folder 15: ASL2010-16Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file and 1 CD
Item 1: The Pacifist Fundamentalist, September 13, 2010Add to your cart.
Speaker: Arsalan Iftikhar; Sponsor: First Year Center; Named Lecture: Freshman Reading Program and First Year Center Lecture; Location: College Hall, WUSTL Residential Area (South 40); Notes: Arsalan Iftikhar, an international human rights lawyer, prominent political commentator and author of the popular blog, TheMuslimGuy.com, will explore some of the themes found in the novel, The Reluctant Fundamentalist by Mosin Hamid, which is this year's reading selection of the Freshman Reading Program. When it comes to presenting the "Islamic" voice in American media, Iftikhar notes the tendency of media to play to exaggerated statements of an intolerant few instead of presenting the tolerant, moderate majority voice. Since the attacks of 9/11, Iftikhar has been battling this tendency, trying to dispel the falsehoods of the uninformed and extremist few who find the spotlight. Iftikhar majored in political science in Arts & Sciences as an undergraduate at WUSTL
Folder 16: ASL2010-17Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio files and 2 CDs
Item 1: Philanthrocapitalism, September 16, 2010Add to your cart.
Speaker: Matthew Bishop; Sponsor: Skandalaris Center; Named Lecture: Skandalaris Center for Entrepreneurial Studies Lecture; Location: May Auditorium, Simon Hall; Notes: In this era of financial morass, is it odd that "mega-giving" is thriving? Not according to Bishop, who with co-author Michael Green has coined the term philanthrocapitalism. As the recent pledges made by billionaires demonstrate, the concept of using a person's wealth, business savvy, and influence to address the world's gravest ills has taken a firm hold on our collective psyche, and it will only grow stronger. Bishop is the U.S. business editor and New York bureau chief of The Economist, and author of many books.
Folder 17: ASL2010-18Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file and 1 CD
Item 1: Improving Criminal Justice for American Indians, September 23, 2010Add to your cart.
Speaker: Kevin Washburn; Sponsor: School of Law and the Native American Law Student Association and Kathryn M. Buder Center for American Indian Studies at the Brown School of Social Work; Location: Anheuser-Busch Hall, Trial Courtroom #309; Notes: As a citizen of the Chickasaw Nation of Oklahoma, Washburn knew firsthand about racial disparities. He now uses his legal expertise to help develop law policy on behalf of American Indians, such as the Tribal Law and Order Act, recently signed by President Obama, which bolsters justice resources for reservations. Washburn is also one of the country's leading experts on gaming law.
Folder 18: ASL2010-19Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file and 2 CDs
Item 1: Reading and Commentary, September 30, 2010Add to your cart.
Speaker: Jonathan Safran Foer; Sponsor: Washington University Libraries (Neureuther Lecture) and  Campus Bookstore and Mortar Board honor society; Named Lecture: Neureuther Library Lecture; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: Foer is widely regarded as one of the most important and most unconventional writers of our time. Hailed by many critics as a work of genius, his first novel, Everything Is Illuminated, was published when he was 25 years old. It was followed by another critically acclaimed novel, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, in 2005. His most recent work, the non-fiction Eating Animals, is an account of his personal journey toward vegetarianism.
Folder 19: ASL2010-20Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file and 1 CD
Item 1: Half the Sky: From Oppression to Opportunity for Women Worldwide, October 04, 2010Add to your cart.
Speaker: Nicholas Kristof; Named Lecture: Benjamin E. Youngsdahl Lecture in Social Policy; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: In his search to shed light on the profound challenges people living in underdeveloped countries must endure, Kristof has frequently placed himself in danger. Despite the atrocities he's witnessed, the two-time Pulitzer Prize- winning op-ed columnist for the New York Times and co-author of Half the Sky: Turning Oppression Into Opportunity for Women Worldwide, remains committed to giving a voice to the most vulnerable.
Folder 20: ASL2010-21Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file and 1 CD
Item 1: Spencer T. Olin Fellows Lecture, October 8, 2010Add to your cart.
Speaker: Cynthia Enloe; Sponsor: Spencer T. Olin Fellowship; Location: Steinberg Hall Auditorium; Notes: As Enloe's research has shown, the effects of globalization on women are vastly different from that of men. She has travelled the globe, talking to women about their everyday lives and analyzing their situations from a distinct feminist perspective. In her many books, Enloe, who teaches at Clark University, exposes the human side of what it means to be female in a global economy. She is this year's Spencer T. Olin Fellows lecturer.
Folder 21: ASL2010-22Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file and 1 CD
Item 1: Reading and Commentary, October 19, 2010Add to your cart.
Speaker: Adam Ross; Sponsor: University Libraries (Neureuther Lecture) and Writing Program; Named Lecture: Neureuther Library Lecture; Location: Women's Building Formal Lounge; Notes: Although Ross's debut novel, Mr. Peanut, bagged the #1 spot on the Huffington Post's "best summer reading," it's anything but lightweight. The graduate of WUSTL's Writing Program uses a murder investigation as a way to create a sophisticated, complex, funny and brutally honest rumination on the institution of marriage. Stephen King put it best when he called Mr. Peanut "The most riveting look at the dark side of marriage since Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?"
Folder 22: ASL2010-23Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: Lecture, October 22, 2010Add to your cart.
Speaker: Colette Avital; Sponsor: Students for a Peaceful Palestinian and Israeli Future; Location: College Hall, South 40 Campus; Notes: The former deputy speaker of the Knesset and former Israeli ambassador has dedicated her career to the service of Israel, to which she emigrated from Romania in 1950. Elected to the 15th Knesset in 1999 as a member of the Labour Party, she served in a number of capacities and chaired committees on ethics, foreign relations, women's issues, and immigration. She held her seat for three legislative terms. Furthermore, she was instrumental in creating a committee that located and restored stolen assets of Holocaust victims. Avital's appearance is sponsored by Students for a Peaceful Palestinian and Israeli Future. This event was not recorded.
Folder 23: ASL2010-24Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file and 1 CD
Item 1: Alfred Wegener and the Origins of Modern Earth Science in the Theory of Continental Drift, November 3, 2010Add to your cart.
Speaker: Mott Greene; Sponsor: Thomas Hall Lecture in the History of Science; Named Lecture: Thomas Hall Lecture in the History of Science; Location: McMillan Hall, room 149; Notes: With the sophisticated methods scientists now access, it's interesting to think about how great discoveries were made a century ago. Greene, a geologist and MacArthur Fellow, has done just that. In his soon-to-be-published book, Greene examines the work of Alfred Wegener, the first earth scientist who recognized the importance of using data from other disciplines. Greene believes this widening of focus was key to Wegener's discovery of continental drift.
Folder 24: ASL2010-25Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file and 1 CD
Item 1: Rites of Return: The Afterlife of the Holocaust in Jewish Memory, November 8, 2010Add to your cart.
Speaker: Marianne Hirsch; Sponsor: Holocaust Memorial Lecture; Named Lecture: Annual Holocaust Memorial Lecture; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: Iconic images of the horrors of the Holocaust are a part of our culture's collective memory. Hirsch studies the ways in which these images became part of one's unconscious understanding of the world and how the past is processed and remembered. Hirsch 's most recent book, Ghosts of Home: The Afterlife of Czernowitz in Jewish Memory, co-authored with Leo Spitzer, offers a profound analysis of memory's echo across generations.
Folder 25: ASL2010-26Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file and 1 CD
Item 1: Beyond Bedrooms and Borders: What a Historian of American Sex Education Learned by Looking Overseas, November 11, 2010Add to your cart.
Speaker: Jonathan Zimmerman; Sponsor: Phi Alpha Theta history honorary; Location: Women's Building Lounge; Notes: As Zimmerman often notes in his books, op-ed pieces, and blogs, the classroom has always been the battleground for America's culture wars. Although the Scopes trial occurred nearly a century ago, the fight over teaching evolution in the classroom, as well as the ongoing conflicts over prayer, sex education, and which "side" gets to tell the story of America in its textbooks -- is as fervent as ever. Zimmerman's solution? Teach all sides of a cultural issue.
Folder 26: ASL2010-27Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file and 1 CD
Item 1: Human Rights: Why it is Mandatory for All of Us, November 17, 2010Add to your cart.
Speaker: Mia Farrow; Sponsor: Gephardt Institute for Public Service and  Elliot Stein Lecture in Ethics; Named Lecture: Elliot Stein Lecture in Ethics; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: The acclaimed actress is also a devoted humanitarian who advocates for African children devastated by armed conflict and civil unrest. As a UNICEF goodwill ambassador, Farrow has helped raise awareness and funds for the millions of children caught in the middle of violent clashes in such countries as Chad, Uganda, and Sudan. For her compassion and service, Farrow was recognized in 2008 as one of the most influential people in the world by Time magazine. This is the annual Elliot Stein Lecture in Ethics.
Folder 27: ASL2010-28Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Beyond Green Jobs: The Next American Economy, November 30, 2010Add to your cart.
Speaker: Van Jones; Sponsor: Green Action, Law & Culture Initiative, Energy & Environmental Law Society, and the Black Law Student Association; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: As he outlines in his 2008 best seller, The Green Collar Economy: How One Solution Can Fix Our Two Biggest Problems, the leading environmentalist believes America's economic restoration lies in the development of clean energy. The former special advisor to President Obama and founder of Green for All has been profiled in Time magazine's "100 Most Influential People" (2009) and in its 2008 issue featuring "Environmental Heroes."
Folder 28: ASL2011-01Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file and  1 CD
Item 1: Poverty, Incarceration and Injustice in America, February 3, 2011Add to your cart.
Speaker: Bryan Stevenson; Sponsor: WUSTL School of Law; Named Lecture: Public Interest Law and Policy Speakers Series (PILPSS); Notes: Consider this statistic from the Equal Justice Initiative website: Since 1972, 130 Americans on death row have been exonerated, which means that one in eight people who have been executed in this country may have been innocent. Stevenson, JD, has produced plenty of evidence showing that the administration of the death penalty is permeated with mistaken identities and racial bias. Since 1989, Stevenson has directed the Equal Justice Initiative, a nonprofit law organization that focuses on social justice and human rights issues in the U.S. criminal justice system.
Folder 29: ASL2011-02Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Angels of Our Nature: Polarization in America and Its Challenge to Universities and Think Tanks, February 7, 2011Add to your cart.
Speaker: Strobe Talbott; Sponsor: Office of the Chancellor and the Office of the Provost, Brookings Institution, and WUSTL's School of Law, Arts & Sciences, the School of Engineering & Applied Science, Olin Business School, WUSTL D.C. Programs, the Department of Political Science in Arts & Sciences, the McDonnell International Scholars Academy, the Weidenbaum Center on the Economy, Government, and Public Policy, and the John C. Danforth Center on Religion & Politics; Notes: Brookings Institution President and statesman Talbott will deliver a policy address regarding the challenge of today's polarization in American politics, now at its worst level since the late 19th century. In reviewing the factors driving this current climate, Talbott will explain the urgency of the problem and its implications for pressing public policy challenges. As head of a prominent think tank, he sees the role of universities and think tanks - bastions of fact-based research and academic freedom - as an antidote to the animosity permeating our society. This program is sponsored by the Office of the Chancellor and the Office of the Provost. Co-sponsors include the Brookings Institution, and WUSTL's School of Law, Arts & Sciences, the School of Engineering & Applied Science, Olin Business School, WUSTL D.C. Programs, the Department of Political Science in Arts & Sciences, the McDonnell International Scholars Academy, the Weidenbaum Center on the Economy, Government, and Public Policy, and the John C. Danforth Center on Religion & Politics.
Folder 30: ASL2011-03Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: The End of an Islamic Republic, February 10, 2011Add to your cart.
Speaker: Hamid Dabashi; Sponsor: Iranian Cultural Society; Named Lecture: Iranian Cultural Society Lecture; Location: Steinberg Hall Auditorium; Notes: As the prospect of a nuclear-armed Iran looms large, the international community, and especially the United States, is faced with limited options for the prospect of peace. But inside Iran, according to Iranian scholar Dabashi, PhD, the republic is grappling with the powerful Green Movement, which arose from the disputed Iranian election in 2009 and the brutal repression of its citizens. In his most recent book, Iran, The Green Movement and the USA: The Fox and the Paradox, Dabashi considers Iran's geopolitics as well as its internal politics, addresses the tumultuous relationship between Iran and the United States, and suggests the best course of action for peace in the region.
Folder 31: ASL2011-04aAdd to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file and 1 CD
Item 1: Three Presidents: Andrew Jackson's Proclamation on Nullification, February 22, 2011Add to your cart.
Speaker: Sean Wilentz; Sponsor: Interdisciplinary Project in the Humanities and the Center for the Humanities Lecture; Named Lecture: President's Week Lectures; Location: Women's Building Formal Lounge; Notes: As the invited speaker to deliver this year's "President's Week" lectures, Princeton historian Wilentz, PhD, will give three talks covering the most important political figures governing the three great transformations of the mid-19th century. The lectures begin with an overview of the role these presidents - Andrew Jackson, Abraham Lincoln and Ulysses S. Grant - played in advancing democratic nationalism, which in turn led to the abolition of slavery. His lecture on Jackson kicks off the mini-series, followed by the second lecture Feb. 23 on Abraham Lincoln's role and the final talk Feb. 24 concentrating on Grant's contributions. This is the Interdisciplinary Project in the Humanities and the Center for the Humanities Lecture.
Folder 32: ASL2011-04bAdd to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file and 1 CD
Item 1: Three Presidents: Abraham Lincoln, February 23, 2011Add to your cart.
Speaker: Sean Wilentz; Sponsor: Interdisciplinary Project in the Humanities and the Center for the Humanities Lecture; Named Lecture: President's Week Lectures;  Location: Women's Building Formal Lounge; Notes: As the invited speaker to deliver this year's "President's Week" lectures, Princeton historian Wilentz, PhD, will give three talks covering the most important political figures governing the three great transformations of the mid-19th century. The lectures begin with an overview of the role these presidents - Andrew Jackson, Abraham Lincoln and Ulysses S. Grant - played in advancing democratic nationalism, which in turn led to the abolition of slavery. His lecture on Jackson kicks off the mini-series, followed by the second lecture Feb. 23 on Abraham Lincoln's role and the final talk Feb. 24 concentrating on Grant's contributions. This is the Interdisciplinary Project in the Humanities and the Center for the Humanities Lecture.
Folder 33: ASL2011-04cAdd to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file and 1 CD
Item 1: Three Presidents: Ulysses S. Grant, February 24, 2011Add to your cart.
Speaker: Sean Wilentz; Sponsor: Interdisciplinary Project in the Humanities and the Center for the Humanities Lecture; Named Lecture: President's Week Lectures; Location: Women's Building Formal Lounge; Notes: As the invited speaker to deliver this year's "President's Week" lectures, Princeton historian Wilentz, PhD, will give three talks covering the most important political figures governing the three great transformations of the mid-19th century. The lectures begin with an overview of the role these presidents - Andrew Jackson, Abraham Lincoln and Ulysses S. Grant - played in advancing democratic nationalism, which in turn led to the abolition of slavery. His lecture on Jackson kicks off the mini-series, followed by the second lecture Feb. 23 on Abraham Lincoln's role and the final talk Feb. 24 concentrating on Grant's contributions. This is the Interdisciplinary Project in the Humanities and the Center for the Humanities Lecture.
Folder 34: ASL2011-05Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Single Player, Multiplayer, MMOG: Design Psychologies for Different Social Contexts, February 24, 2011Add to your cart.
Speaker: Ernest Adams; Sponsor: WU Game Developers Society; Named Lecture: WU Game Developers Society Lecture; Location: Steinberg Hall Auditorium; Notes: Electronic gaming is here to stay, whether they are played online, on a computer, or on a console. No one understands this better than Adams, a giant in game design and development whose credits include the Madden NFL Football series. But all games are not equal, and what makes them different is the designer's ability to understand how people play and what makes a game more satisfying to play than others. Adams' presentation will consider the importance of understanding the different psychologies that underpin games.
Folder 35: ASL2011-07Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, March 23, 2011Add to your cart.
Speaker: Rebecca Skloot; Sponsor: Diversity Initiatives, the Woman's Club of Washington University, African and African-American Studies in Arts & Sciences, the Department of Education in Arts & Sciences, University Libraries, the Social Justice Center, Government and Community Relations, and the School of Law and Missouri History Museum and the Academy of Sciences; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: When a poor African-American woman died of cervical cancer in 1951, no one could have foreseen the magnitude of her contribution to medicine. Thus begins Skloot's intriguing medical saga in her debut book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. Cancer cells taken from Henrietta's body without her knowledge or her permission became the world's first replicating human cell line. Research from these cells launched a medical revolution and generated spectacular medical discoveries and treatments. Her poignant story covers this terrain while also examining the personal ordeal of the Lacks family, who were never told of Henrietta's gift, never received any compensation, and who today cannot afford health insurance.
Folder 36: ASL2011-08Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Democracy and the Internet, March 25, 2011Add to your cart.
Speaker: Jimmy Wales; Sponsor: Global Leadership Conference;  Named Lecture: Global Leadership Conference Keynote Address; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: In 1999, Wales set out to transform the concept of the encyclopedia and adapt it for the Internet age. Instead of creating entries the traditional way - giving the tasks to subject experts - he opened it up to anyone willing to contribute. Despite predictions that chaos would ensue, it didn't, thanks to a software program called a wiki. Wales added a feature that allowed anyone to track and edit existing entries, ushering in a radical populist approach. Today, a mere decade later, Wikipedia has about 16 million entries made by 91,000 contributors, available in 270 languages, making it the largest reference site on the web, and making Wales one of the founding fathers of social media. This is the keynote address for the Global Leadership Conference.
Folder 37: ASL2011-09Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: The Most Trusted Stranger in America: Frank Warren's PostSecrets, March 29, 2011Add to your cart.
Speaker: Frank Warren; Sponsor: Association of Mixed Students; Named Lecture: Association of Mixed Students Lecture; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: This is the story of a tiny art project that became an international sensation through the simple distribution of postcards. In 2004, Warren, bored with his job, placed hundreds of blank postcards around his community, inviting persons to divulge their innermost secrets through words and art, and mail them back to him. When the postcards began returning in droves, he was amazed by the confessions and personal statements, which ranged from sentimental to heartbreaking, and matched in emotion by some of the most creative artwork he had ever seen. Now, with five books, a traveling exhibition, and one of the most visited blogs on the web, Warren provides a conduit to the world, allowing anyone to communicate their feelings, share the pain of a buried secret and experience the cathartic nature of healing from its exposure. This event was not recorded.
Folder 38: ASL2011-10Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Post Racial America: Fact or Fiction?, April 1, 2011Add to your cart.
Speaker: Julian Bond; Sponsor: Chancellor's Fellowship Conference; Named Lecture: Chancellor's Fellowship Conference Keynote Address; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: Bond arguably is the best person to weigh in on the current state of racial relations. As a teenager, the civil rights leader helped create the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, the organization that advanced the movement to such a profound extent that they succeeded in integrating Atlanta's movie theatres, lunch counters and parks. For more than four decades, Bond has been advancing the civil rights cause and has been on the cutting edge of social change as an activist, politician, civil rights leader, university professor and author. This is the keynote address for the Chancellor's Fellowship Conference. At 2 p.m., a panel discussion to further explore the points made in Bond's talk will be held in the Women's Building Formal Lounge. Additional events will take place on March 31 and include a presentation on research and a panel discussion on "Navigating a Career in Academia" featuring WUSTL faculty of color.
Folder 39: ASL2011-11Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio/visual file and 1 CD
Item 1: Fukushima: The Science and Health Effects of the Nuclear Disaster in Japan, April 1, 2011Add to your cart.
Speaker: Henry Royal, Lee Sobotka and Michael Wysession; Location: Lab Science Building, Room 300; Notes: Amid the daily, dire news emanating from Japan, the world watches as its citizens try their best to cope with life in the post-earthquake, post-tsunami country. Thankfully, those two tragic events are over, but a third tragedy, the ongoing nuclear disaster, won't be over any time soon. Now new fears are emerging about food and water safety - a fundamental need for a country with hundreds of thousands suffering refugees already without the most basic resources. These fears are partly the result of not understanding what is really occurring within the nuclear power facilities. To help clarify the increasingly confusing situation, two Washington University scientists and experts in nuclear science and radiation, Henry Royal, MD, professor of radiology at the School of Medicine, and Lee Sobotka, PhD, professor of chemistry in Arts & Sciences, will offer their expertise in an Assembly Series lecture. The lecture, "Fukushima: The Science and Health Effects of the Nuclear Disaster in Japan," is free and open to the public. Sobotka and Royal's presentation will focus on the scientific and technical aspects behind the volatile situations in the four buildings housing the damaged reactors. Sobotka, an expert in basic nuclear science, will delve into reactor physics, isotope production and the chemistry behind the disaster. After earning a doctoral degree from the University of California, Berkeley, Sobotka joined the WUSTL faculty in 1984. He has conducted experiments in 18 particle accelerator laboratories in the United States and abroad in an effort to understand what makes some atomic nuclei stable and others unstable. Royal is a professor of radiology and associate director of nuclear medicine at the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, both in the School of Medicine. His contribution to the lecture will focus on the health effects of radiation, a subject in which he has a wealth of experience. His work on the study of health effects of radiation exposure ranges from the Chernobyl disaster, in which he co-led that section of the International Atomic Energy Agency's official examination, to the Nevada Atomic Bomb Tests, serving on the Committee on Public Health Implications of Exposure to I-131.
Folder 40: ASL2011-12Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: Diversity: On TV, Behind the Scenes and in Our Lives, April 5, 2011Add to your cart.
Speaker: Soledad O'Brien; Sponsor: Association of Black Students; Named Lecture: Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Lecture; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: O'Brien has been America's eyewitness to some of the most significant events on this planet since joining CNN in 2003. Her reports on Hurricane Katrina, the Southeast Asian tsunami, and the London terrorist attacks, to name a few, have garnered a large and faithful following, as well as a number of prestigious journalism awards. But perhaps her most lasting contribution is her award-winning special series and documentaries on our changing nation. To address the dearth of reporting on communities of color and to fight the status quo reporting of stereotypes, O'Brien has created compelling stories with lasting value, most notably the "Black in America" and the "Latino in America" series. This is the annual Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Lecture, sponsored by the Association of Black Students. This event was not recorded.
Folder 41: ASL2011-13Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Inventing the Female Nude: Praxiteles, Phyrne and the Knidia, April 7, 2011Add to your cart.
Speaker: Andrew Stewart; Sponsor: John and Penelope Biggs Lecture in the Classics; Named Lecture: John and Penelope Biggs Lecture in the Classics; Location: Steinberg Hall Auditorium; Notes: Stewart is a world-renowned authority on Greek sculpture, ancient art and architecture, and archaeology, and is known for his ability to place the creation of art in relation to the political, social, cultural, and intellectual issues of their day. Some of his most influential books include Greek Sculpture: An Exploration; Art, Desire, and the Body in Ancient Greece; and Classical Greece and the Birth of Western Art.
Folder 42: ASL2011-14Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file and 1 CD
Item 1: Adele Starbird Lecture, April 13, 2011Add to your cart.
Speaker: Maria Bernadette Majella Doyle; Sponsor: WU Women's Society; Named Lecture: Women's Society Annual Lecture; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: If Majella Doyle had not become a surgeon, she might have gone into business, or perhaps become a professional show horse jumper, her life-long love. And if Doyle hadn't left Dublin for St. Louis, there would be one less life-saving liver transplant surgeon in the WUSTL School of Medicine surgery department. After receiving her medical training from the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, a chance encounter with the university's transplant unit chief led to a one-year fellowship at Barnes-Jewish Hospital. Now, more than five years later, she has planted roots here, and will talk about her work.
Folder 43: ASL2011-15Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Skandalaris Center Lecture, April 14, 2011Add to your cart.
Speaker: Barton Brooks; Sponsor: Skandalaris Center; Named Lecture: Skandalaris Center Awards Event for Social Entrepreneurs; Location: Simon Hall, May Auditorium; Notes: If someone is going to change the world, why shouldn't it be me? With that sudden realization, Barton Brooks began Global Colors, his organization that sees a need and finds the human and monetary resources to address that need. The chosen projects are aimed at providing immediate solutions, such as digging a well, creating a rice bank, or building a school. The impact of Global Colors can be found throughout the world. Name a country and you are likely to find a village or group of people his organization has helped.
Folder 44: ASL2011-16Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: What's Food Got to Do with It? Meals and Meaning in the Civil Rights Era, April 20, 2011Add to your cart.
Speaker: Rafia Zafar; Sponsor: Phi Beta Kappa / Sigma Xi; Named Lecture: Phi Beta Kappa / Sigma Xi Annual Lecture; Notes: Social scientists have long understood the significance of food in the study of humankind. The humanities, however, have more recently begun to focus on its connection to history and culture. But not Rafia Zafar: As a specialist in 19th-century American and African-American literature, she has long recognized that the act of eating, especially communally, is significant to our understanding of history. Zafar, a WUSTL professor of English, African and African-American studies, and American culture studies, will provide insight into how the act of eating communally (think of the lunch counter sit-ins) impacted the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s.
Folder 45: ASL2011-17Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: Steven Galloway Reading and Panel Discussion, September 12, 2011Add to your cart.
Speaker: Steven Galloway; Sponsor: First Year Center; Notes: Author Steven Galloway reads from his novel "The Cellist of Sarajevo," this year's Freshman Reading Program selection. The program also includes a question and answer session with Galloway. This event was not recorded.
Folder 46: ASL2011-18Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: Navigating a Post-9/11 World: A Decade of Lessons Learned, September 15, 2011Add to your cart.
Speakers: Ahmet T. Karamustafa, R. Marie Griffith, Sahar E. Aziz, John R. Bowen, Gulten Ilhan; Sponsors: Gephardt Institute for Public Service, John C. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics, The American Constitution Society for Law and Policy, The Muslim Students Association, Institute for Social Policy and Understanding; Notes: Navigating a Post-9/11 World: A Decade of Lessons Learned will explore the challenges that have surfaced between our society's quest for greater national security and the ideals of civil liberty and religious freedom - particularly toward the American Muslim population. This event was not recorded.
Folder 47: ASL2011-19Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Reconciliation Through Healing, September 19, 2011Add to your cart.
Speaker: Jeremy Courtney; Sponsor: Skandalaris Center for Entrepreneurial Studies; Location: May Auditorium; Notes: Jeremy Courtney, one of the founders of the Preemptive Love Coalition (PLC), gives a talk for the Washington University in St. Louis Assembly Series on "Reconciliation through Healing," and outlines his belief that in the midst of violence there is opportunity to provide healing which opens the doors to reconciliation.
Folder 48: ASL2011-20Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: A New Understanding of Hunger, Obesity and the Food System, September 23, 2011Add to your cart.
Speaker: Ellen Gustafson; Named Lecture: Olin Fellows Lecture; Location: Bryan Cave Moot Courtroom, Anheuser-Busch Hall; Notes: Gustafson, a former U.N. spokesperson for the World Food Program and former executive director of the FEED Foundation, addresses the world's hunger and obesity problems as a holistic global food issue. She hopes that over the next 30 years, our food and agricultural systems will provide healthy balanced meals for everyone.
Folder 49: ASL2011-21Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: Screening of "The PhD Movie" and Talk, September 26, 2011Add to your cart.
Speaker: Jorge Cham; Sponsors: The Graduate Professional Council, The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences; Notes: Screening of "The PhD Movie" and talk with Jorge Cham, creator of the PHD Comics that inspired the movie. This event was not recorded.
Folder 50: ASL2011-22Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Tennessee Williams at 100: From Washington University to the Wider World, October 6, 2011Add to your cart.
Speaker: Henry I. Schvey; Location: Steinberg Hall Auditorium; Notes: Part of a series of events celebrating the centennial year of Tennessee William's birth, and the 75th anniversary of his matriculation at Washington University, Schvey's talk explores how Washington University and the city of St. Louis shaped Williams as a person and into one of America's best playwrights.
Folder 51: ASL2011-23Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Can Religion and Politics Make Us More Civil and Not Just Angry?, October 10, 2011Add to your cart.
Speaker: E.J. Dionne; Sponsor: The John C. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: In books, essays, newspaper columns and commentaries on television and radio, Dionne analyzes and reports on American politics and its intersection with various aspects of society, especially religion. Currently, he believes the country is entering a period of governmental reform and renewed civic activism in our communities. More than 100 newspapers publish his Washington Post op-ed column, and he joins his conservative colleague David Brooks for a weekly commentary on NPR. As the fall keynote speaker for the John C. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics, Dionne will present his thoughts on the question "Can Religion and Politics Make Us More Civil and Not Just Angry?"
Folder 52: ASL2011-24Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Global Warming--New Results from an Independent Assessment, October 19, 2011Add to your cart.
Speaker: Richard Muller; Named Lecture: Arthur Holly Compton Lecture; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: Muller, a distinguished astrophysicist, is a committed advocate for immediate action to address the growing problem of man-made climate change. Muller is leading a group of scientists and statisticians to conduct an independent study to determine if the accepted wisdom of the scientific establishment is, in fact, the truth. The group launched the Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature project in 2009, using innovative techniques for measuring the Earth's warmth, and has released preliminary results that have revived the debate over this controversial subject.
Folder 53: ASL2011-25Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: American Grace: How Religion Divides and Unites Us, November 2, 2011Add to your cart.
Speaker: Robert D. Putnam; Sponsors: The Weidenbaum Center on the Economy, Government, and Public Policy, The Gephardt Institute for Public Service, The John C. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics, The Center for Social Development at the Brown School, The Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Work and Social Capital; Notes:Putnam's talk examines the interaction of religion and politics in America over the past half-century and how religion both contributes to and detracts from the vibrancy and stability of American democracy. This event was not recorded.
Folder 54: ASL2011-26Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: The Moral Complexity of the Child Soldier "Problem", November 9, 2011Add to your cart.
Speaker: David Rosen; Named Lecture: Holocaust Memorial Lecture; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: David Rosen, JD, PhD, professor of anthropology and of law at Fairleigh Dickinson University and author of "Armies of the Young: Child Soldiers in War and Terrorism," presents his perspective on "The Moral Complexity of the Child Soldier 'Problem'".
Folder 55: ASL2012-01Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Healing the Heart of Democracy, February 10, 2012Add to your cart.
Speaker: Parker Palmer; Sponsors: John C. Danforth Center for Religion & Politics, the Gephardt Institute for Public Service, and Office of Residential Life; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: "We don't want to know what we really know, because if we did, we'd have to change our lives." These words from Parker Palmer, bestselling author, educator, and founder/senior partner of the Center for Courage and Renewal, reveal the underlying principle at work in his most recent book, Healing the Heart of Democracy: The Courage to Create a Politics Worthy of the Human Spirit. It grew out of his own experience, a lifetime process to rid himself of illusions and discover "a workable reality." It's a remedy that contains as much hope as reality, a hallmark of Palmer's philosophy. His enlightenment was hard won, and he draws upon his individual struggle to illustrate a parallel situation occurring in American society. In Healing the Heart of Democracy he pleads for our country-and the body politic-to understand that our very democracy is at stake, and it's time to stare reality in the face and begin the healing process.
Folder 56: ASL2012-02Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: Healing the Heart of Democracy-A Gathering of Spirits for the Common Good, February 10, 2012Add to your cart.
Speakers: Parker Palmer and Carrie Newcomber; Sponsors: John C. Danforth Center for Religion & Politics, the Gephardt Institute for Public Service, and Office of Residential Life; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: Palmer will be joined onstage by singer/songwriter Carrie Newcomer in a music spoken word event titled "Healing the Heart of Democracy-A Gathering of Spirits for the Common Good." Their goal is best expressed in Newcomer's own words: "Our music and spoken word event aims to integrate heart and mind, story and song. The presentation will be quietly counter-cultural as we speak the words of the poets, the prophets, and the dreamers, and sing music that comforts the heart and engages the mind. We hope to offer a reminder of the value and worth of our individual stories as well as the power of the gathered community when we agree to roll up our sleeves and work together for the common good." With15 albums to her credit, Newcomer is celebrated for her blend of rich alto, poetic lyricism, and a unique spiritual perspective. She has toured with such folk luminaries as Alison Krauss and Union Station, has recorded songs with Mary Chapin Carpenter, and received a Grammy Award in 2003 for her song, "I Should Have Known Better," recorded by Nickel Creek.
Folder 57: ASL2012-03Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Lecture, February 24, 2012Add to your cart.
Speaker: Deanne Bell; Sponsors: WUSTL student organizations: EnCouncil and Engineers without Borders; the School of Engineering & Applied Science; and the Woman's Club of Washington University; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: Inspiring the next generation of engineers is a mission Bell embraces, and drives home her belief that engineering is critical to innovation. Throughout her television career, the 2002 WUSTL graduate in mechanical engineering has been debunking stereotypes while showing how much fun engineers have. She has appeared in the Peabody Award-winning PBS series, "Design Squad," Discovery Channel's "SmashLab," and ESPN's "Rise Up". For National Geographic's "The Eygptian Job," a tale of an ancient heist, Bell must determine how giant slabs of rock were moved, without anyone noticing. In addition to her broadcast roles, Bell has designed optical navigation systems for the aerospace industry. This event is sponsored by WUSTL student organizations: EnCouncil and Engineers without Borders; the School of Engineering & Applied Science; and the Woman's Club of Washington University.
Folder 58: ASL2012-04Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: The Third Industrial Revolution: How Lateral Power Is Transforming Energy, the Economy, and the World, February 27, 2012Add to your cart.
Speaker: Jeremy Rifkin; Named  Lecture: Annula Elliot Stein Lecture in Ethics; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: THIS EVENT WAS CANCELLED. Rifkin is an influential social critic and economist widely consulted by governments around the globe, and widely read, with numerous bestselling books that tackle large-scale issues such as the impact of new knowledge and new technology on daily life. In his latest book, The Third Industrial Revolution: How Lateral Power Is Transforming Energy, the Economy, and the World, Rifkin lays out his vision of the next great economic shift-a profound overhaul of society based on the power of emerging technologies with renewable energies-to create a new global paradigm.
Folder 59: ASL2012-05Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Cultural Agoraphobia: Why Most of What You Know About the Internet is Wrong, February 29, 2012Add to your cart.
Speaker: James Boyle; Named Lecture: Interdisciplinary Project in the Humanities Lecture Series; Location: Anheuser-Busch Hall Bryan Cave Moot Courtroom; Notes: On January 18, Congress received a strong warning from online information providers that going forward with two pending anti-piracy bills will severely limit the Internet's open, dynamic environment. (That same day, the bills' sponsors began backing down.) This is the latest salvo in the ongoing legal war that pits protection of intellectual property against the desire for unfettered access. But the Internet's unique sharing properties make an already complicated subject even more so. One of the leading scholars on the side of open access is James Boyle, whose research shows that ever tightening restrictions on reasonable access is preventing the world's collection of intellectual and artistic concepts from entering the public domain, to the detriment of society.
Folder 60: ASL2012-06Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: Lecture, March 6, 2012Add to your cart.
Speaker: Susan Lindee; Named Lecture: Thomas Hall Lecture; Location: McDonnell Hall Room 162; Notes: Lindee, professor in the department of history and sociology of science, and associate dean for the social sciences in the School of Arts & Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania, will deliver the Thomas Hall Lecture on "LeRoy Matthews and the Cleveland Comprehensive Treatment Program for Cystic Fibrosis, 1957-1961." Before LeRoy Matthews developed a therapeutic protocol in the late 1950s, cystic fibrosis (CF) was a children's disease-simply because very few of its victims made it to adulthood. Lindee's presentation will explore Matthews' life, work and the key role he played in the transformation of CF into an adult disease. It is a complicated and fascinating account, made all the more so in the broader context of the era's post-war understanding of human genetics, including the legacies of eugenics and the potential for molecular genetics. In addition, Lindee will lead a brown bag session on "Learning to Lie: Militarization of Scientific Knowledge in the Twentieth Century," from 12 -1:30 p.m. in Life Sciences Building, Room 202.
Folder 61: ASL2012-07Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Tiger Mom, March 6, 2012Add to your cart.
Speaker: Amy Chua; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: When Chua's extremely candid memoir cum child rearing manual, Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother, hit the bookstands last year, it elicited very strong reactions, both for and against the Yale law professor's parental philosophy that patterns itself on the Chinese model rather than the Western approach. One of Chua's main criticisms of American child-rearing is that it creates weak and confused children who will not be prepared for the real world. She sees the Western tendency for parents to "coddle" their children and reward them even when it's unwarranted, as setting them up for failure. The book revealed a culture clash of enormous proportions, giving insights into the sometimes harsh yet unquestioningly effective way of producing strong, achievement-directed young adults.
Folder 62: ASL2012-08Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: It's Religion, Stupid, Not the Economy, March 20, 2012Add to your cart.
Speaker: The Rev. Barry W. Lynn; Sponsors: John C. Danforth Center for Religion & Politics and the Assembly Series; Location: Knight Center Room 200; Notes: America is in the grip of a true culture war, and as the founder of Americans United for the Separation of Church and State, the Reverend Barry Lynn is a combat soldier, trying to get Americans to stop searching the Bible for answers and start consulting the U.S. Constitution. Lynn, an ordained minister and constitutional lawyer, points out that during the creation of the Constitution, the injustice of living under a state-imposed faith was fresh in the minds of our Founding Fathers. They knew firsthand that religion, when united with the power of government, was a recipe for tyranny. The result is a Constitution that insures the citizens of our nation absolute freedom of religion. But in today's society, political groups are defining that freedom in very different ways. As the 2012 Republican presidential candidates continue to focus on perceived assaults on religious freedom rather than on economic recovery, Lynn will explore how this came to be and how it will impact the campaign and the country going forward.
Folder 63: ASL2012-09Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: Group Genius: The Creative Power of Collaboration, March 26, 2012Add to your cart.
Speaker: R. Keith Sawyer; Sponsor/Event: Phi Beta Kappa Lecture; Location: College Hall; Notes: R. Keith Sawyer would heartily agree with the proverb: Two heads are better than one. Based on his research, the WUSTL professor, prolific author and leading scholar on creativity, innovation, and group dynamics contends that most successful people do not create in a vacuum. Rather, they build upon the contributions from those who came before, and they work in a collaborative environment with colleagues. As he demonstrates in his book, Group Genius: The Creative Power of Collaboration, contrary to widespread opinion everyone has the capacity to be creative if given the opportunity to break free from hierarchical restrictions and self-imposed beliefs that stifle creativity and innovation.
Folder 64: ASL2012-10Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Race and Affirmative Opportunity in the Barack Obama Era, March 27, 2012Add to your cart.
Speaker: William Julius Wilson; Sponsor/Event: Chancellor's Fellows Lecture; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: The eminent sociologist and author has been studying the conditions of life in the American inner city for nearly four decades. His groundbreaking 1996 book, When Work Disappears: The World of the New Urban Poor, illustrated in startling detail the death blow delivered to inner city inhabitants by the loss of unskilled but living wage jobs in their own communities. Wilson is interested in developing solutions for surmounting the "equal playing field" dilemma and getting past the heated rhetoric. In his presentation, he will survey the landscape of racial- and class-based preferences, then present a case for opportunity enhancing affirmative action programs based on flexible, merit-based criteria for evaluation, rather than numerical guidelines or quotas. He says this works and he should know: it was the method used by the University of Chicago to recruit him into the faculty in the early 1970s.
Folder 65: ASL2012-11Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Silly Serious Science: Homage to IgNobel and Ben Franklin, April 4, 2012Add to your cart.
Speaker: Dudley Herschbach; Sponsor/Event: Annual Ferguson Science Lecture; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: In 2011, the IgNobel Award in chemistry was given for designing a method to wake sleepers during a fire by flinging wasabi horseradish at them. Goofy, yes; inconsequential, definitely not. For the uninitiated, the IgNobel Awards, invented by Marc Abrahams, editor of Annals of Improbable Research (AIR) and complete with its own ceremony and traditions, appear to mock scientific inquiry. But the experiments are designed, in the words of NPR host Ira Flatow, "to first make you laugh, then make you think." Many otherwise serious scientists, such as Dudley Herschbach, Nobel Laureate in Chemistry (1986), view the Igs as complementary to the prizes Alfred Nobel launched in 1901. As a long time participant and judge, Herschbach thinks that science and humor have been a winning combination for many successful Americans, all the way back to Ben Franklin. Prepare to be enlightened and amused.
Folder 66: ASL2012-12Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: The Quest for Moral Wisdom in Academic Life: Why William James Still Matters for the Art of Living, April 5, 2012Add to your cart.
Speaker: Arthur Kleinman; Sponsors: Anthropology Department, East Asian Languages and Cultures Department, Program for the Humanities in Medicine in the School of Medicine, Alpha Epsilon Delta; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: Kleinman, a celebrated physician and anthropologist, has devoted his career to the study of how people learn to forge a life with meaning and purpose when faced with dangers and uncertainties from serious illness and personal catastrophes to political violence and social turmoil. He has studied the survivors of China's Cultural Revolution, Americans and Chinese with stigmatized health conditions, and family caregivers for patients at end of life. He himself was primary caregiver for his wife and collaborator, Joan Kleinman, who died of Alzheimer's Disease in 2011. Out of these experiences and over four decades, he has developed influential theories, including illness as felt experience, explanatory models, social suffering, local moral worlds, the divided self, and medicine as moral practice-ideas that have become central to medical anthropology, cultural psychiatry, global health, and the medical humanities. He is a prolific author who has published textbooks as well as very personal, moving narratives.
Folder 67: ASL2012-13Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: Agrippa's Inscription on Hadrian's Pantheon, April 5, 2012Add to your cart.
Speaker: Mary Boatwright; Named Lecture: John and Penelope Biggs Lecture in the Classics; Location Steinberg Hall Auditorium; Notes: The original Pantheon, built in 27-25 BCE by the Roman magistrate Marcus Agrippa, was remarkable for its size, construction, and design. It burned down in 80 AD but was rebuilt many years later by the Emperor Hadrian. Mary Boatwright, one of the foremost scholars on Imperial Rome's buildings and public works, also finds it remarkable that Hadrian chose to name Agrippa as the temple's patron, when it was commonplace at the time to give attribution to the current emperor. Boatwright's illustrated lecture will focus on the meaning of the Pantheon's dedicatory inscription, "M. AGRIPPA.L.F.CONS.TERTIUM.FECIT," and consider the types of evidence used to understand monuments at that time.
Folder 68: ASL2012-14Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: Ending Violence One Green Dot at a Time, April 11, 2012Add to your cart.
Speaker: Dorothy Edwards; Location: Lab Sciences Room 300; Notes: Dorothy Edwards, executive director of Green Dot etcetera, will give an overview of the Green Dot Community Mobilization Strategy and inspire participants to see their role in prevention. Green Dot harnesses the power of individual choices to shift our current cultural norms, from bystander inaction to a communitythat is actively and visibly intolerant of violence. Edwards will provide an overview of the role all community members have in promoting community safety and will instill hope that together we can markedly reduce current rates of power-based personal violence.
Folder 69: ASL2012-15Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates, September 4, 2012Add to your cart.
Speaker: Wes Moore; Sponsor: First Year Reading Program; Location: College Hall; Notes: Moore will discuss the experiences detailed in his best-selling memoir The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates. In it, Moore shares how he grew up in a world impoverished in all senses of the word. His life trajectory propelled him out of the ghetto to become a Rhodes Scholar, decorated Navy Seal veteran, White House Fellow and entrepreneur. The successful Wes Moore discovers that there is another Wes Moore -- one with a strikingly similar background, who did not escape the tragic fate of so many trapped in a community bereft of positive support. The other Wes Moore, the author discovers, is a convicted murderer serving a life sentence. As they begin to know each other and compare their lives, they provide startling and profound insights into the mystery of how two similar individuals could end up with such divergent destinies.
Folder 70: ASL2012-16Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: How Children Succeed, September 11, 2012Add to your cart.
Speaker: Paul Stough; Sponsors: Department of Education in Arts & Sciences, Brown School, and KIPP Inspire Academy; Location: Women's Building Formal Lounge; Notes: "Character is molded by the environment in which we grow up," author Paul Tough writes. "It can be taught not just by parents, but by schools, coaches and mentors as well. Which means we all have a responsibility to help kids develop their character -- as well as their math skills." Through exposes such as The New York Times Magazine cover piece "Can Character Be Taught?" and his new book How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity and the Hidden Power of Character, Tough shares what he has learned about pioneering approaches to education that instill traits such as resiliency, self-control and empathy, in addition to academics. Tough cites the KIPP (Knowledge Is Power Program) philosophy, which embraces this approach, as an example of how teaching character traits is key to helping students from underserved backgrounds earn college degrees.
Folder 71: ASL2012-17Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: Lecture, September 14, 2012Add to your cart.
Speaker: Ruby Bridges; Event: Dr. John B. Ervin Scholars' 25th Anniversary Celebration Keynote Address; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: Many decades after Ruby Bridges broke the color barrier in New Orleans' public school system, she continues to share her extraordinary story of a six-year-old whose bravery and fortitude in the face of danger helped break down the forces of segregation. It's a history that closely parallels the American history of race relations during the last half-century. Bridges' program serves as the keynote event for the 25th anniversary of the Ervin Scholars Program, which was founded by James E. McLeod in honor of the university's first African-American dean, John B. Ervin, to foster a richly diverse educational atmosphere on campus and enhance the quality and diversity of the student body.
Folder 72: ASL2012-18Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: Immigrants, Citizens, and American Public Law, September 17, 2012Add to your cart.
Speaker: Mariano-Florentino (Tino) Cuellar; Sponsor/Event: Constitution Day Lecture sponsored by the School of Law and the Richard Gephardt Institute for Public Service; Location; Anheuser-Busch Hall, Bryan Cave Moot Courtroom 310; Notes: Contrary to popular belief that federal agencies are too bloated or bureaucratic to be effective, Tino Cuellar, JD, PhD, says U.S. federal agencies do work toward becoming more efficient and effective. Cuellar, this year's Constitution Day speaker, certainly has the credentials to make such a statement. The Stanford University law professor has advised the Clinton and Obama administrations on a broad range of public policies from immigration to crime, food security and international relations, as well as serving in advisory positions affecting a long list of national policy initiatives.
Folder 73: ASL2012-19Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: The $10 Million a Minute Bus Tour to Educate Citizens about the National Debt Crisis, September 18, 2012Add to your cart.
Speaker: David Walker; Location: Lab Sciences Building Room 300; Notes: David M. Walker, former U.S. comptroller general, will bring his "$10 Million a Minute Tour" promoting fiscal responsibility to the Washington University in St. Louis campus. Walker, CEO of the Comeback America Initiative (CAI), is leading a national monthlong bus tour to bring attention to the economic and fiscal challenges facing the United States.
Folder 74: ASL2012-20Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Liberal Arts: The Higgs Boson of Higher Education, October 2, 2012Add to your cart.
Speaker: Waler Massey; Event: James E. McLeod Lecture on Higher Education; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: Walter Massey, PhD, president of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, has made the most of his liberal arts education. It gave him the knowledge and abilities to think, reason, analyze, decide, discern and evaluate, and to use these tools to enjoy a long, fulfilling life and several successful careers. His appreciation of liberal arts makes him the ideal person to deliver the first annual James E. McLeod Lecture on Higher Education. The 1966 WUSTL alumnus is also a champion for improving minority student education.
Folder 75: ASL2012-21Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Becoming a Catalyst for Change, October 3, 2012Add to your cart.
Speaker: Erin Gruwell; Event: Spencer T. & Ann W. Olin Fellows Lecture; Location: Anheuser-Busch Hall, Bryan Cave Moot Courtroom 310; Notes: Walter Massey, PhD, president of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, has made the most of his liberal arts education. It gave him the knowledge and abilities to think, reason, analyze, decide, discern and evaluate, and to use these tools to enjoy a long, fulfilling life and several successful careers. His appreciation of liberal arts makes him the ideal person to deliver the first annual James E. McLeod Lecture on Higher Education. The 1966 WUSTL alumnus is also a champion for improving minority student education.
Folder 76: ASL2012-22Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: An Evening with Sarah Vowell, October 8, 2012Add to your cart.
Speaker: Sarah Vowell; Event: American Culture Studies Lecture; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: Sarah Vowell is an extraordinary storyteller. To fans of This American Life radio show, she needs no introduction. From 1996 to 2008, Vowell entertained and enlightened listeners with her unusual, quirky tales. She brings that same beguiling style to her books, essays and columns, revealing an American history that will never be found in standard texts. In her sixth, most recent book, Unfamiliar Fishes, Vowell presents the history of the 50th state, Hawaii. In addition to Unfamiliar Fishes, her two other bestsellers are The Wordy Shipmates, which portrays the New England Puritans like they have never been portrayed; and Assassination Vacation, a strange, but intriguing road trip to sites dedicated to murdered U.S. presidents.
Folder 77: ASL2012-23Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: The Third Industrial Revolution: How Lateral Power is Transforming Energy, the Economy and the World, October 11, 2012Add to your cart.
Speaker: Jeremy Rifkin; Named  Lecture: Annula Elliot Stein Lecture in Ethics; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: According to Jeremy Rifkin, the world witnessed the end of the modern era in July 2008, when geopolitical and socioeconomic forces sent the cost of oil soaring to $147 a barrel. Eighteen months later, there was a worldwide financial collapse. How the world got to this critical point, and how to take advantage of the opportunities on the horizon, are the basic themes in Rifkin's latest book, The Third Industrial Revolution: How Lateral Power is Transforming Energy, the Economy and the World. Rifkin is the visionary president of the Foundation on Economic Trends, a consultant to the European Union, and author of 19 books exploring the impact of scientific and technological changes on the economy, the workforce, society and the environment.
Folder 78: ASL2012-24Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: American Meat: Film viewing and discussion, October 17, 2012Add to your cart.
Speaker: Graham Meriwether; Sponsors: Bon Appetit, Dining Services, Office of Sustainability; Location: Simon Hall, May Auditorium; In his film American Meat, inspired by Michael Pollan's book, The Omnivore's Dilemma, director/producer Graham Meriwether set out to capture a year in the life of a small farm and, in doing so, had his perspective changed. The result, four-and-a-half years later, is a film that presents the pros and cons of various farm practices and captures the beginning of the small-farm revolution. A showing of the 82-minute film will be followed by a discussion, led by Meriwether, with a panel of experts involved in the food industry, plus a sampling of foods from local and artisan farmers, courtesy of WUSTL Dining Services and Bon Appetit.
Folder 79: ASL2012-25Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: Reflections on Sephardic Jewries and the Holocaust, October 29, 2012Add to your cart.
Speaker: Aron Rodrigue; Event: Holocaust Memorial Lecture; Location: Umrath Lounge; Notes: Aron Rodrigue's groundbreaking research on the Sephardic Jewish experience during the Holocaust has put to the rest the widely held notion that Sephardim living in the Balkans and other European lands during the Holocaust were not as badly affected as the Ashkenazi in Eastern Europe. The truth is that they experienced widespread persecution and destruction, just as other Jewish communities under Nazi occupation. Rodrigue specializes in the history and culture of Sephardi and French Jewries as well as modern Jewish history, Jews of modern France, minority identities and the Ottoman Empire.
Folder 80: ASL2012-26Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: 350: The Most Important Number in the World, November 1, 2012Add to your cart.
Speaker: Bill McKibben; Event: Sustainabilty Conference Keynote Address; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: For more than two decades, prominent environmental author and advocate Bill McKibben has combined scientific knowledge about the increasing carbonization of the planet and its deleterious effects with an activist's determination. His message: "We are living on a fundamentally altered planet, and this new planet is not as nice as the old one, as recent inhospitable weather conditions demonstrate." But McKibben points out that there is reason to be hopeful, and the twin messages of good news/bad news runs through his many books, essays and articles as well as serving as the basis for his major initiative, called "350," explaining the dismal scientific facts, while spreading the message that it's not too late to enlighten policymakers and call them to action. McKibben delivers the keynote presentation for WUSTL's Sustainable Cities conference to be held Nov. 1-3.
Folder 81: ASL2012-27Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: Lecture, November 16, 2012Add to your cart.
Speaker: Ken Burns; Sponsor/Event: Washington University International Humanities Prize, sponsored by The Center for the Humanities; Location: 560 Music Center, E. Desmond Lee Concert Hall; Notes: Just two days before his film The Dust Bowl airs on PBS stations, acclaimed filmmaker Ken Burns will be on campus to receive The International Humanities Medal, which is accompanied by the Washington University Humanities Prize, and give a talk for the Assembly Series. Burns rose to fame with the debut in 1990 of The Civil War, which aired on PBS stations and set new standards for documentary filmmaking. He followed up four years later with Baseball. In both miniseries and in many subsequent ones, Burns revealed an American culture deeply conflicted about and uniquely shaped by race.
Folder 82: ASL2013-01Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Europeans in Polynesia/Polynesians in Europe: Discovering Eros in the South Pacific, February 6, 2013Add to your cart.
Speaker: Anthony Pagden; Sponsor/Event: Interdisciplinary Project in the Humanities Lecture; Location: Women's Building Lounge; Notes: Throughout his long teaching, writing and research career, Anthony Pagden has studied the arc of European history, the elements that make up a European identity, and what results when this identity slams up against native cultures, as it often did throughout the centuries of European exploration, conquest and colonization. In such important contributions as Lords of All the World: Ideologies of Empire in Spain, Britain and France 1500-1800; European Encounters With the New World: From Renaissance to Romanticism; and The Idea of Europe: From Antiquity to the European Union; the prolific historian and political scientist sheds light on how centuries of European encounters shaped notions of the clash of civilizations. Pagden will deliver a second public lecture, "Three Modes of Modernity: Patriotism, Nationalism, Cosmopolitanism," at noon Thursday, Feb. 7, in the Women's Building Formal Lounge.
Folder 83: ASL2013-02Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: The Signal and the Noise: Why So Many Predictions Fail - But Some Don't, February 11, 2013Add to your cart.
Speaker: Nate Silver; Event: Washington University Political Review Lecture; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: As the past presidential election can attest, forecasting isn't easy. It helps to be a brilliant statistician and know to avoid the Big Three No-No's: bias, conventional wisdom and overconfidence. But the real key to accurate predictions, according to Nate Silver, is the ability to separate the "signal" (relevant information) from the "noise" (data). His extraordinary ability to translate numbers into real outcomes - time after time - has made the author and blogger a champion of everyone who applauds intellect over opinion. In his New York Times blog, FiveThirtyEight, and his new book, The Signal and the Noise: Why Many Predictions Fail but Some Don't, Silver applies his methods not only to politics (and famously, baseball) but to many other subjects as well.
Folder 84: ASL2013-03Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Making Our Voices Heard: Women's Rights Today, February 12, 2013Add to your cart.
Speaker: Sandra Fluke; Sponsor: Danforth Center for Religion & Politics; Location: Simon Hall, May Auditorium; Notes: Last year, during the heated debate regarding employer insurance coverage for birth control, Georgetown University law student Sandra Fluke spoke out in favor of mandatory coverage and unwittingly stepped into the crossfire of those on opposite sides of the mandate debate. The most vocal opposition was led by radio talk show host Rush Limbaugh, who called her a "slut" and claimed she wanted taxpayers to "pay for her to have sex." Since then, Fluke gave a stirring speech at the Democratic National Convention, earned a law degree, and continues to work for women's rights and larger social justice issues such as sex trafficking and domestic abuse.
Folder 85: ASL2013-04Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness, February 18, 2013Add to your cart.
Speaker: Susannah Cahalan with WUSTL Professors Len Green, Rebecca Lester, and Eugene Rubin; Location: Simon Hall, May Auditorium; Notes: Susannah Cahalan's harrowing medical trauma sounds like something straight out of the TV medical series "House." A healthy young woman is sitting calmly at home when suddenly her arms whip straight out and stiffen like a mummy's, her eyes roll back, and foam spurts out of her mouth. For the next month, Cahalan, a 2007 WUSTL graduate and New York Post reporter, would experience not only seizures, but also strange, terrifying hallucinations and paranoid fixations - symptoms that led to the conclusion that she was psychotic. Fortunately for Cahalan, a real "Dr. House" solved the medical mystery. The long road back to recovery is another fascinating aspect of the story, recounted in her book Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness. After a reading, Cahalan will be joined by Washington University faculty for a discussion of her malady and ensuing experience. They are: Leonard Green, PhD, professor of psychology, and Rebecca Lester, PhD, professor of anthropology, both in Arts & Sciences; and Eugene Rubin, MD, PhD, professor of psychiatry, School of Medicine.
Folder 86: ASL2013-05Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: The (Honest) Truth about Dishonesty: How We Lie to Everyone - Especially Ourselves, March 6, 2013Add to your cart.
Speaker: Dan Ariely; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: Despite our best intentions, why do we fail to act in our own best interests? Why do we eat that chocolate cake? Overvalue what we have a vested interest in? Puff up our resume? Lie, cheat and steal? According to behavioral economist Dan Ariely, there are unseen forces at work that are constantly influencing human behavior. Through his best-selling books, beginning with Predictably Irrational, and his popular presentations on the TED website, Ariely is dedicated to helping us live more sensible - if not rational - lives. His interests span a wide range of behaviors and his results often fly in the face of conventional wisdom.
Folder 87: ASL2013-06Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: Stonehenge: New Discoveries, March 27, 2013Add to your cart.
Speaker: Mike Parker Pearson; Event: Ferguson Science Lecture; Location: Steinberg Hall Auditorium; Notes: Stonehenge, located in southwestern England, is one of the world's best known and most enigmatic monuments. Theories regarding its purpose abound and its creation has been attributed to lost civilizations, ancient druids, prehistoric astronomers, ancient Eygptians, and even extra-terrestrials. Attempting to unlock the secrets of the massive stone circle, a major investigation was launched in 2003, led by the renowned British archaeologist Mike Parker Pearson. Called the Stonehenge Riverside Project, the six-year initiative expanded the physical area of research and yielded many exciting discoveries: a large settlement, a new stone circle known as "Bluestonehenge," and the remains of people buried at Stonehenge. The discoveries were so significant that the project received three major archaeological awards and Parker Pearson was named "Archaeologist of the Year" in 2010.
Folder 88: ASL2013-07Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: The Future of Cities, April 2, 2013Add to your cart.
Speaker: Daniel Libeskind; Sponsor/Event: Architecture Student Council (SU) and Sam Fox School Lecture; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: As he recounts in his TED talk, "Seventeen Architectural Words of Inspiration," visionary architect Daniel Libeskind sees architecture as a story of a struggle against improbabilities, and notes that, "Architecture is not based on concrete and steel and the elements of the soil. It's based on wonder." That wonder is apparent in much of his work, such as the Jewish Museum Berlin, one of the most visited museums in Europe. Libeskind's extensive portfolio reads like a trip around the world: the Grand Canal Theatre in Dublin, Ireland; the Imperial War Museum North in Greater Manchester, England; the Michael Lee-Chin Crystal at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, Canada; the Danish Jewish Museum in Copenhagen, Denmark; and the Wohl Centre at the Bar-Ilan University in Ramat-Gan, Israel.
Folder 89: ASL2013-08Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: The Importance of the Concept of Culture to Science and Society, April 9, 2013Add to your cart.
Speaker: Robert W. Sussman; Sponsor/Event: Phi Beta Kappa/Sigma Xi Lecture; Location: Steinberg Hall Auditorium; Notes: "The anthropological concept of culture is extremely important and often misunderstood because many of the things that are assumed to be biologically determined, like criminality or homosexuality or IQ, are really behaviorally and societally defined." This quote from WUSTL physical anthropologist Robert W. Sussman forms the basis for his Phi Beta Kappa/Sigma Xi Lecture, "The Importance of the Concept of Culture to Science and Society. His talk will be based on his presentation given at the February 2013 conference of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, which stressed the need to understand how the adoption of strict biological determinism -- formed out of the legitimate scientific theories of Darwin, Mendel and others in the 19th century -- led to the eugenics movement in the U.S. and to the rise of Nazism, and overshadowed the profound role the anthropological concept of culture plays in human behavior.
Folder 90: ASL2013-09Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: Christians in the Roman Arena, April 11, 2013Add to your cart.
Speaker: Kathleen Coleman; Event: John and Penelope Biggs Classics Lecture; Location: Steinberg Hall Auditorium; Notes: Imagine the delight of Kathleen Coleman, Harvard Latin scholar and expert in gladiatorial combat, when asked to serve as chief academic consultant for Ridley Scott's 2000 Oscar-winning Hollywood blockbuster, "Gladiator." The delight, however, soon turned sour when she discovered that her work had little impact on the finished product - so little, in fact, that she asked to be listed in the credits without any mention of her function." "Gladiator" fans will be able to get the real story, complete with fascinating details, when Coleman delivers the annual Biggs Lecture in the Classics. Her presentation will examine the culture of arena spectacles, as well as Roman penal theory and practice, to set Christian martyrdom in the context of its times and take into consideration the expectations and attitudes of Roman authorities and audiences.
Folder 91: ASL2013-10Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: Lecture, April 17, 2013Add to your cart.
Speaker: Cynthia Brinkley; Sponsor/Event: Women's Society Lecture; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: With a management career spanning 25 years, Cynthia Brinkley is the epitome of the strong corporate leader. At AT&T, she held several leadership positions within the company, including president of AT&T Missouri and of AT&T Arkansas. When she left that firm in 2011 for the American auto manufacturing giant, General Motors (GM), she was senior vice president for talent development and chief diversity officer. That background prepared her to take on her current role as GM's vice president for global human resources. In this capacity, Brinkley oversees more than 200,000 employees. In addition, Brinkley offers her time and expertise to educational organizations such as the National Oasis Institute, and, closer to home, as a member of Washington University's Board of Trustees.
Folder 92: ASL2013-11Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Notes from No Man's Land, September 9, 2013Add to your cart.
Speaker: Eula Bliss; Sponsor: First Year Reading Program; Location: Edison Theater; Notes: As the recent racial controversies make clear, Americans and American law still are grappling with slavery's legacy. And as Biss' essays in Notes from No Man's Land, this year's choice for the First Year Reading Program, make abundantly clear, that legacy is ambiguous, complicated, and tied inextricably with questions of identity that are deeply embedded in our culture. Biss' first collection, The Balloonists, was published in 2002; Notes from No Man's Land, published seven years later, won the National Book Critics Circle Award for criticism. Her essays have appeared in numerous literary anthologies, including The Best American Nonrequired Reading and The Best Creative Nonfiction, as well as literary journals such as the Seneca Review and The Believer.
Folder 93: ASL2013-12Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: NASA's GreenLab Research Facility: A Potential Global Solution for Water, Food/Feed, Fuel, and Energy, September 20, 2013Add to your cart.
Speaker: Bilal Mark McDowell Bomani; Location: Whitaker Hall Auditorium; Notes: Bomani is the kind of research scientist whose low profile belies the significance of his work at NASA's Glenn Research Center, where his team is creating biofuels that are sustainable, renewable and alternative. He uses the term "extreme green" to describe the objective: to develop the next generation of aviation fuels that do not use any of the Earth's most precious resources - fresh water and arable land - but do use some of the safest and most plentiful products found in nature.
Folder 94: ASL2013-13Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Government and Health Care: Perspectives from a President and a Physician, September 25, 2013Add to your cart.
Speaker: Alfredo Palacio; Event: Global Health Week; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: During his years as minister of health, vice president and president of the Republic of Ecuador, Palacio's reputation as a reformer was well-founded. He led many efforts to initiate economic and social advancements, especially in health care. The cardiologist (who trained at Washington University's School of Medicine) is a strong advocate for universal medical coverage and is credited with beginning the modernization of health care in his country. Palacio's appearance is part of WUSTL's Global Health Week, which runs Sept. 23-27 and includes an international fair as well as a host of activities, demonstrations and talks designed to educate and entertain the public on a broad range of health-care issues, including nutrition and cooking.
Folder 95: ASL2013-14Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: The State of Conscience in University Life Today, September 30, 2013Add to your cart.
Speaker: Ruth Simmons; Sponsors: The Center for the Humanities, College of Arts& Sciences, and Office of the Provost; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: There have been many "firsts" in Ruth Simmons' life, chief among them being the first African-American president of an Ivy League university. Hers was an extraordinary transformation, which began as the 12th child of sharecroppers, and it was one fueled solely by education. The scholar and academic leader has been dedicated to expanding access to higher education and extolling the value of a liberal arts education, two overarching goals that reflect the philosophy of the late, beloved WUSTL teacher and administrator, Jim McLeod.
Folder 96: ASL2013-15Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: Health-care Reform: What It Is, Why It's Necessary, How It Works, October 4, 2013Add to your cart.
Speaker: Jonathan Gruber; Sponsors: Gephardt Institute for Public Service and the Weidenbaum Center on the Economy, Government and Public Policy, both in Arts & Sciences; the Brown School and the School of Law; Location: Brown Hall Room 100; Notes: Just a few days after the Affordable Care Act's mandatory insurance component becomes law, the principal architect of the Massachusetts system and chief adviser to President Obama's plan will be on campus to explain the costs and benefits of health-care reform. The title of his talk is the same as his comic book that explains in 140 delightful pages the 1,000-page legal document.
Folder 97: ASL2013-16Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Embryos in Evolution and Evolving Embryos: An Historical Overview, October 7, 2013Add to your cart.
Speaker: Brian Hall; Location: McDonnell Room 162; Notes: For most of the 20th century, scientists attempting to understand how body structures change focused on either developmental biology or evolutionary biology. Then, during the 1970s, scientific trailblazers such as Hall, Stephen Jay Gould and Gunther Wagner began to merge the two concepts. It was in this new field called evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo) where breakthroughs occurred in understanding how body structures change - and advance - through evolution. Hall's research, predominantly in the area of the early vertebrate embryo known as the neural crest and its derived craniofacial skeleton, has led to a greater understanding of how cellular differentiation works.
Folder 98: ASL2013-17Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Republic Lost: How Money Corrupts Congress - and a Plan to Stop It, October 10, 2013Add to your cart.
Speaker: Lawrence Lessig; Sponsor/Event: School of Law Public Interest Law & Policy Speaker Series; Location: Bryan Cave Moot Courtroom; Notes: Legal scholar, author and political activist Lessig approaches societal problems with a pragmatism firmly rooted in a philosophical idealism. Whether it's advocating for sensible intellectual property law that more aptly reflects the needs of a digitized citizenry, or taking up a cause he now carries close to his heart - removing the corrupting influence of money from American politics - Lessig finds a pathway to progress. His first address will focus on how our political system is broken and his proposal to fix it. In the second program, he will discuss aspects of technology that are changing the ways libraries are run and used.
Folder 99: ASL2013-18Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: Afghanistan, Heroin and Women, October 16, 2013Add to your cart.
Speaker: Fariba Nawa; Location: Umrath Lounge; Notes; Afghanistan's $65 billion a year opiate industry destroys thousands of lives each year by creating addicts, by killing the addicted, by violence associated with the drug trade, and in many other, less obvious ways. When Afghan-American journalist Nawa traveled back to her native land between 2000 and 2007, she was shocked by stories such as Darya's, the 12-year-old daughter of a dealer sold into marriage with a middle-aged drug lord to pay off her father's debt. On the other hand, she found that some women farmers were benefiting from the drug trade. These stories compelled her to write Opium Nation: Child Brides, Drug Lords and One Woman's Journey through Afghanistan.
Folder 100: ASL2013-19Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: Lecture, October 25, 2013Add to your cart.
Speaker: Shabana Basij-Rasikh; Sponsor/Event: Olin Fellowship Lecture; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: "If we have to spill our blood to pay your school fees, then we will," Basij-Rasikh's father told her many years ago when she was illegally attending a secret school during the Taliban's reign in Afghanistan. To receive an education, great risks were taken, but she grew up in a family where education was prized and daughters were treasured. Now the graduate of Middlebury College provides educational opportunities for the next generation of girls through the School of Leadership, Afghanistan (SOLA) a boarding school she co-founded and runs, and through other global initiatives for women's education.
Folder 101: ASL2013-20Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, November 1, 2013Add to your cart.
Speaker: Michelle Alexander; Sponsors; Missouri History Museum and the School of Law; Location: Bryan Cave Moot Courtroom; Notes: Although Jim Crow laws institutionalizing segregation were overturned decades ago, Alexander's book, The New Jim Crow observes that it's perfectly legal to discriminate against convicted criminals, a group predominantly made up of African-American men. Today's U.S. criminal justice system has relegated millions to permanent second-class status, effectively creating the same racial caste system as Jim Crow, as felons are denied basic civil and human rights long after they are released. (On the book: http://newjimcrow.com)
Folder 102: ASL2013-21Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: Srebrenica's Legacies of Loss and Remembrance, November 5, 2013Add to your cart.
Speaker: Sarah Wagner; Location: Umrath Lounge; Notes: In her book, To Know Where He Lies: DNA Technology and the Search for Srebrenica's Missing, anthropologist Wagner tells the story of the 1995 massacre in Srebrenica, when 8,000 Bosnian Muslims were killed and their bodies dumped into mass graves. Loved ones had little hope of identifying physical remains until the advent of DNA technology that resulted in more than 6,000 victims identified. Their remains are now interred in a memorial site that marks the worst atrocity in European history since World War II.
Folder 103: ASL2013-22Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: The Future of the St. Louis Region, November 6, 2013Add to your cart.
Speakers: Panel Discussion, including Holden Thorp, Peter Raven, William Powderly; Location: Simon Hall May Auditorium; Notes: The St. Louis region has much to offer, but what about its future - a future tied closely to Washington University's? To celebrate the centennial anniversary of Clayton's founding, experts will offer their thoughts on how our region will fare in the future. They include WUSTL provost Holden Thorp, PhD, who will address education, and plant conservationist Peter Raven, PhD, who will explore environmental sustainability. A third panelist to discuss medicine and health care will be announced prior to the event.
Folder 104: ASL2013-23Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: Trafficking, Prostitution, and Inequality, November 14, 2013Add to your cart.
Speaker: Catharine MacKinnon; Sponsors: Law, Identity & Culture Initiative in the School of Law; the Brown School; Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies, in Arts & Sciences; Association of Women Faculty; and the Office of the Provost; Location: Bryan Cave Moot Courtroom; Notes: Perhaps no one person has changed the legal landscape of sex equality in the United States more than MacKinnon. She pioneered the concept that sexual abuse violates equality rights, as well as the legal claim that sexual harassment is sex discrimination. In the international arena, she represented Bosnian survivors of sexual atrocities, winning legal recognition of rape as an act of genocide and a $745 million settlement.
Folder 105: ASL2014-01Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Divine Beauty and Its Ghosts: Nietzsche, Weil and Foucault, February 4, 2014Add to your cart.
Speaker: March D. Jordan; Sponsor/Event: Interdisciplinary Project in the Humanities; Location: Umrath Hall Lounge; Notes: Mark D. Jordan, PhD, the Neaves Distinguished Professor of Religion and Politics at the John C. Danforth Center on Religion & Politics at Washington University, will kick off a three-part lecture series for WUSTL 's Interdisciplinary Project in the Humanities. All three talks begin at noon in Umrath Hall Lounge. Jordan has titled the series "Divine Beauty and Its Ghosts: Nietzsche, Weil, and Foucault." The Assembly Series event on Tuesday will focus on Nietzsche, with the Wednesday, Feb. 5 and Thursday, Feb. 6 programs covering Simone Weil and Michel Foucault, respectively.
Folder 106: ASL2014-02Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Brave Genius: A Scientist's Journey from the French Resistance to the Nobel Prize, February 6, 2014Add to your cart.
Speaker: Sean B. Carroll; Sponsors: Arts & Sciences and the Institute for School Partnership; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: Sean Carroll is an evolutionary biologist, popular author, educator, and WUSTL alumnus who discovered the beauty of the humanities while studying biology as a student here. His embrace of both worlds informs his most recent book, Brave Genius, which chronicles the adventures of Jacques Monod, a co-founder of the field of molecular biology, from the dark years of the German occupation of Paris to the heights of the Nobel Prize; his friendship with the great writer Albert Camus; and his emergence as a public figure and leading voice of science. A booksigning will follow.
Folder 107: ASL2014-03Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide, February 11, 2014Add to your cart.
Speaker: Sheryl WuDunn; Sponsors:  WUSTL Student Group "Half the Sky" and Gephardt Institute for Public Service; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: Sheryl WuDunn studies and writes about the economic, political and social forces affecting women throughout the globe. She is a Pulitzer Prize-winning writer and author of Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide. But Half the Sky is more than a book; it also is a powerful social justice and economic movement that is positively affecting millions of womens' lives. A booksigning will follow.
Folder 108: ASL2014-04Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Opportunities and Challenges Facing America Today, February 25, 2014Add to your cart.
Speaker: Jon Hunstman, Jr.; Sponsors: Washington University Political Review student organization in partnership with the Gephardt Institute for Public Service and the Weidenbaum Center on the Economy, Government and Public Policy; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: As a candidate during the 2012 presidential primary campaign, Huntsman was known as "the Reasonable Republican" and it's easy to see why: although the former two-time Governor of Utah and former Ambassador to China under President Obama no longer holds public office, he continues to be a voice for civil discourse and sound business and government policies.
Folder 109: ASL2014-05Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: The Age of Insight: The Quest to Understand the Unconscious in Art, Mind and Brain from Vienna 1900 to the Present, March 3, 2014Add to your cart.
Speaker: Eric Kandel; Event: Arthur Holly Compton Science Lecture; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: Nobel Laureate Eric Kandel has been called a titan of modern neuroscience. He also is a Renaissance man whose Viennese birthplace produced what he calls "The Age of Insight," a dynamic flourishing of science and art brought on by the meeting of such revolutionary minds as Freud and Klimt. Kandel's talk will explore the neuroscience of aesthetics outlined in his book by the same name, written in an attempt by the author to answer this question: How are internal representations of a face, a scene, a melody, or an experience encoded in the brain?"
Folder 110: ASL2014-06Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Change Your Brain by Transforming Your Mind, March 5, 2014Add to your cart.
Speaker: Richard Davidson; Sponsors/Event: Witherspoon Memorial Lecture, sponsored by Religious Studies Program and Department of Psychology; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: In 1992 neuroscientist Richard Davidson was challenged by His Holiness, the 14th Dalai Lama, to apply the rigors of brain science to study positive qualities of mind. The Dalai Lama picked the right person. In the ensuing decades Davidson has discovered ways to help people live happier, healthier lives through mental skills training such as meditation and yoga.
Folder 111: ASL2014-07Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: The 50th Anniversary of the Civil Rights Act, March 18, 2014Add to your cart.
Speaker: Chai Feldblum; Sponsors: School of Law, Women's Law Caucus, The Woman's Club of Washington University and the Gephardt Institute of Public Service; Location: Anheuser-Busch Hall, Bryan Cave Moot Courtroom; Notes: As one of five members of the bipartisan Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), Chai Feldblum is responsible for upholding the federal laws against workplace discrimination. It's a fitting job for someone dedicated to advocating for the rights of minorities and who was instrumental in the creation of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. To mark the half centennial anniversary of the Civil Rights Act as well as celebrate International Women's Day, Feldblum will share her views about the meaning of this milestone in American history.
Folder 112: ASL2014-08Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: How Curiosity Changed My Life, March 26, 2014Add to your cart.
Speaker: Adam Steltzner; Sponsor: Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: NASA called it "seven minutes of terror." In August 2012 the world watched to see if the Mars rover, Curiosity, a one-ton robot hurtling towards the red planet at 13,200 miles per hour, would gently land on the surface or explode on contact. The planned landing allowed for zero margin of error. No problem - the perfect landing was made all the more dazzling for the fact that its lead engineer and public "face" of the effort, Adam Steltzner, aka Elvis, flunked high school geometry and used to play in a rock band. Steltzner's talk will explore both types of curiosity - the rover and the human attribute, and opine on where space exploration should head next.
Folder 113: ASL2014-09Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: Greece Between Antiquity and Modernity: Views of Two Early 19th Century Travelers, March 27, 2014Add to your cart.
Speaker: John Camp; Event: John and Penelope Biggs Lecture in the Classics; Location: Steinberg Hall Auditorium; Notes: John Camp will serve as this year's John and Penelope Biggs Lecturer in the Classics. A world-renowned archaeologist, Camp is director of the Agora excavations in Athens, the longest continuing excavation in Greece.
Folder 114: ASL2014-10Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Lust, Romance, Attachment: The Drive to Love and Whom We Choose, April 4, 2014Add to your cart.
Speaker: Helen Fisher; Sponsors: Student Union, Student Health Advisory Committee; Location: Louderman Hall #458; Notes: "We die for love; we kill for love: Twas ever thus." But why? That's the question biological anthropologist Helen Fisher has been asking for decades. From her research, she has identified three brain systems driving the universal human desires of lust, romantic love and long-term attachment. Among her best-selling books is the most recent, "Why Him? Why Her?" Her TED talks are among the most popular; "Why We Love, Why We Cheat" has been viewed by more than 5 million people.
Folder 115: ASL2014-11Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: The International Bank of Bob, April 10, 2014Add to your cart.
Speaker: Bob Harris; Sponsor: Skandalaris Center for Entrepreneurial Studies; Location: Simon Hall May Auditorium; Notes: While in Dubai to write about its luxury resorts, Bob Harris accidentally stumbled upon the ugly story behind the beautiful hotels: these structures for the rich were being built on the backs of poverty stricken workers. Determined to help these individuals, Harris began issuing loans via the microloan financing site, Kiva.com. Not content to sit back and enjoy changing lives from afar, Harris decided to travel the world, meet these men and women and record their life-changing dramas. The result is "The International Bank of Bob" a witty and poignant account of his encounters with the people he was helping, one $25 loan at a time.
Folder 116: ASL2014-12Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT RECORDED
Item 1: From Salesman to Hamletmachine: The Need for the Humanities, April 17, 2014Add to your cart.
Speaker: Holden Thorp; Event: Phi Beta Kappa Lecture; Location: Simon Hall May Auditorium; Notes: Holden Thorp, WUSTL provost and executive vice chancellor for academic affairs, will consider the current state of the humanities in American higher education and examine the arguments and strategies being used to garner support for teaching and research in the humanities in the current fiscal and political context.
Folder 117: ASL2014-13Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Covering: The Hidden Assault on Our Civil Rights, September 8, 2014Add to your cart.
Speaker: Kenjo Yoshino; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: Yoshino is the Chief Justice Earl Warren Professor of Constitutional Law at New York University where he specializes in constitutional law, civil rights law, and law and literature. Prior to this appointment, he taught law at Yale and Harvard universities. The Rhodes Scholar received his undergraduate degree from Harvard and his law degree from Yale. In Covering: The Hidden Assault on Our Civil Rights, Yoshino gives his readers plenty to consider about the act of "covering," why it's done and how it harms people's individuality. Part autobiography and part legal discourse, Covering includes much of Yoshino's personal journey as a gay Asian American, and is his impassioned plea to understand what people lose when they sacrifice aspects of their true nature to fit in. In addition to Covering, he has published A Thousand Times More Fair, which uses Shakespearean stories to illustrate contemporary problems of justice.
Folder 118: ASL2014-14Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: The Importance and Ethics of National Intelligence, September 16, 2014Add to your cart.
Speaker: Jack Devine; Sponsors/Event: Elliot Stein Lecture in Ethics, sponsored by Weidenbaum Center on the Economy, Government and Public Policy in Arts & Sciences; WU Political Review; Location: Steinberg Hall Auditorium; Notes: During his 30-year tenure as the CIA's acting director of operations (now called the National Clandestine Service) Jack Devine served as America's top spymaster for eight presidents. He was at the helm of every major covert initiative: Charlie Wilson's war in Afghanistan, Allende's fall in Chile, Iran-Contra, and the list goes on. In addition to serving as a memoir, his book, Good Hunting: An American Spymaster's Story, is a warning about what Devine sees as the degradation of our nation's ability to spy, and the misuse of citizens' private information. A book signing will follow.
Folder 119: ASL2014-15Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT AVAILABLE
Item 1: From Brown to Ferguson: The Unfinished Business of Civil Rights, September 17, 2014Add to your cart.
Speaker: Sherrilyn Ifill; Location: Anheuser-Busch Hall, Bryan Cave Moot Courtroom; Notes: In her 2014 New York University convocation address, Sherrilyn Ifill noted the year's significance: the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act, the 50th anniversary of Freedom Summer, and the 60th anniversary of the Supreme Court's decision in Brown v the Board of Education. "Brown," she said, "was the most important constitutional moment of the 20th century
Folder 120: ASL2014-16Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT AVAILABLE
Item 1: The University and the Combinations of Heart and Mind, September 29, 2014Add to your cart.
Speaker: Roderick Ferguson; Location: Umrath Hall Lounge; Notes: In Roderick Ferguson's 2012 book, The Reorder of Things: The University and its Pedagogies of Minority Difference, he argues that the rise of interdisciplinary studies on college campuses in the 1960s and 1970s - originally designed to give voice to minority culture - ended up being co-opted and institutionalized by established power. He certainly is in a position to analyze the legacy of these liberationist social movements, as the distinguished critical race and gender theorist's career has been inside these academic entities.
Folder 121: ASL2014-17Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT AVAILABLE
Item 1: Love in the Time of Identity Wars: Anatomy of Short Lives, September 30, 2014Add to your cart.
Speaker: Patricia Williams; Sponsors/Event: Interdisciplinary Project in the Humanities Lecture, part of the Law School's Public Interest Law & Public Speaker  Series, sponsored by Center for Humanities in Arts& Sciences, Law, Identitity and Culture Initiative, Black Law Students Association, and Women's Law Caucus in the School of Law, Office of the Provost, Vice Chancellor for Diversity; Location: Anheuser-Busch Hall, Bryan Cave Moot Courtroom; Notes: The great granddaughter of a slave and a white southern lawyer, scholar and author Patricia Williams has dedicated her career to applying literary and critical legal theory to matters of race and social justice. Her column in The Nation, "Diary of a Mad Law Professor," features such topics as affirmative action, gender and professionalism, and the forensic uses of DNA. In her autobiographical essay, "The Alchemy of Race and Rights," the Columbia University law professor uses the metaphor of alchemical transformation to indicate how we might find ourselves as communal agents of racial justice. A book signing will follow.
Folder 122: ASL2014-18Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT AVAILABLE
Item 1: Demystifying the Science of Drug Addiction: Neuroscience, Self-discovery, Race and U.S. Drug Policy, October 10, 2014Add to your cart.
Speaker: Carl Hart; Event: Chancellor's Fellows Lecture; Location: Anheuser-Busch Hall, Bryan Cave Moot Courtroom; Notes: "As a politician, you can use 'crack cocaine' as a code word and say you're going after it, but you're actually going after people we don't really like in our society." That statement from neuroscientist Carl Hart explains in part why we've been lied to about drugs. Instead of relying on hard data and facts, government drug policies are being driven by media sensationalism and by politicians who want to score easy points with their constituents. In his book High Price, Hart argues for separating the myths from the reality to ensure that the focus moves from scaring people away from drugs to informing people about them. Despite criticism for his claims, Hart, the first tenured African-American professor of sciences at Columbia University, stands by his research, believing that society is simply afraid to accept it. A book signing will follow.
Folder 123: ASL2014-19Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT AVAILABLE
Item 1: Fires, Fuel and the Fate of 3 Billion, October 13, 2014Add to your cart.
Speakers: Guatam Yadama and Mark Katzman; Sponsors: McDonnell Scholars Academy, International & Graduate Programs, Whitney R. Harris World Law Institute, International Law Society, and Law & Social Work Society in the School of Law; Location: Anheuser-Busch Hall, Bryan Cave Moot Courtroom; Notes: Three billion people in the developing world use biomass combustion in stoves to cook their meals and heat their homes. The cruel irony is that the stove that keeps them fed and warm is also killing them. In fact, four million people die each year from the dense, black soot released by biomass combustion. What's more, the practice harms the community's ecosystem. This presentation by Brown School professor Gautam Yadama and award-winning photographer Mark Katzman will highlight the challenges created by the widespread dependency on this deadly practice. A book signing will follow.
Folder 124: ASL2014-20Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT AVAILABLE
Item 1: Why Liberals Win: America's Culture Wars from the Election of 1800 to Same-Sex Marriage, October 23, 2014Add to your cart.
Speaker: Stephen Prothero; Sponsor/Event: Danforth Distinguished Lecture/Danforth Center on Religion & Politics; Location: Knight Hall, Emerson Auditorium; Notes: Only 12 percent of those who took Stephen Prothero's Religious Literacy Quiz were able to name the first five books of the Hebrew Bible or the Christian Old Testament. Though the Boston University professor of religion describes himself as "religiously confused," he is an advocate for including Bible literacy and world religion courses in public school curricula. In his book, The American Bible: How Our Words Unite, Divide, and Define a Nation, Prothero asserts that religion lies at the heart of our American identity and, unless we become religiously literate, it will continue to divide us as a nation. A book signing will follow.
Folder 125: ASL2014-21Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT AVAILABLE
Item 1: Talking About Race in 19th-century American Science: Louis Agassiz and His Contemporaries, October 27, 2014Add to your cart.
Speaker: Christoph Irmscher; Event: Thomas Hall Lecture in the History of Science; Location: Rebstock Hall, Room 215; Notes: One hundred and fifty years ago, the charismatic, brilliant and controversial Swiss immigrant Louis Agassiz came to America, became the most famous scientist of the time, and established the foundation for modern American science. He also was a white supremacist who vehemently disagreed with Darwin's theory of evolution. Irmscher's biography doesn't shy away from the scientist's dark side, but rather paints a full picture of a man who was extraordinarily prolific and influential in so many scientific fields, yet blinded by his own prejudices.
Folder 126: ASL2014-22Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT AVAILABLE
Item 1: The Age of Insight: The Quest to Understand the Unconscious in Art, Mind and Brain from Vienna 1900 to the Present, October 28, 2014Add to your cart.
Speaker: Eric Kandel; Event: Arthur Holly Compton Science Lecture; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: After a half-century of studying the neurons of sea snails and mice, for which he received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2000, Eric Kandel turned his intellectual curiosity to the field of neuroaesthetics. He wished to answer the question, "How are internal representations of a face, a scene, a melody, or an experience encoded in the brain?" The result is The Age of Insight, a fascinating account that combines the science of neurochemical cognitive circuitry with a portrait of fin de si
Folder 127: ASL2014-23Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT AVAILABLE
Item 1: Through Soviet Jewish Eyes: Photography, War and the Holocaust, November 4, 2014Add to your cart.
Speaker: David Shneer; Event: Holocaust Memorial Lecture; Location: Wilson Hall, Room 214; Notes: The Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung called David Shneer a "path breaking" scholar, who uses photography as a new way of considering issues of Russian Jewish history, Yiddish culture, the diaspora, and the Holocaust. His critically acclaimed book, Through Soviet Jewish Eyes: Photography, War, and the Holocaust: Jewish Cultures of the World, examines the Holocaust through the perspectives of wartime photographers assigned by the Stalinist regime to record the visual story of Nazi atrocities. A co-founder of Jewish Mosaic, the first national Jewish LGBT organization, Shneer also studies the relationship between Jews and sexuality.
Folder 128: ASL2014-24Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT AVAILABLE
Item 1: As a Woman I Have No Country, as a Woman My Country is the World of Architecture, November 7, 2014Add to your cart.
Speaker: Nasrine Seraji; Event: Coral Courts Lecture; Location: Steinberg Hall Auditorium; Notes: The internationally distinguished architect, Nasrine Seraji, will deliver the keynote address for the School of Architecture's symposium on "Women in Architecture: 1974-2014." The Iranian-born founding partner of the Paris-based firm, Atelier Seraj, embraces the notion of architecture as both a cultural debate and a practice, and her work ranges from urban and institutional buildings to small houses and installations. Two of her housing projects in France were nominated for the prestigious Mies Van der Rohe Prize.
Folder 129: ASL2014-25Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT AVAILABLE
Item 1: An Evening with Curtis Sittenfeld, November 12, 2014Add to your cart.
Speaker: Curtis Sittenfeld; Sponsor/Event: Neureuther Library Lecture/University Libraries; Location: Simon Hall, May Auditorium; Notes: "I'm wary of books about boarding school," she once said in The New York Times, but Curtis Sittenfeld's first novel, Prep, outclassed every boarding school book that came before it. Both commercially and critically successful, Prep offers a scathing behind-the-scenes look at an elite Massachusetts boarding school seen through the eyes of someone who doesn't fit in. Sittenfeld's subsequent novels: The Man of My Dreams, a coming of age story; and American Wife, a tale based loosely on the life of former First Lady Laura Bush, also were best sellers. The New England transplant is now firmly rooted in St. Louis, which plays a role in her most recent novel, Sisterland.
Folder 130: ASL2015-01Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT AVAILABLE
Item 1: Toward a Just and Inclusive America, January 22, 2015Add to your cart.
Speaker: Xavier de Souza Briggs; Location: Brown Hall Lounge; Notes: Briggs is a leading authority on economic opportunity, racial and ethnic diversity, and innovation in urban areas within the United States and around the globe. He is on leave from the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at Massachusetts Institute of Technology to serve as vice president for the Ford Foundation's Economic Opportunity and Assets division. Briggs' books have won many awards in the social sciences fields. His most recent publication, "Moving to Opportunity: The Story of an American Experiment to Fight Ghetto Poverty," (2010) won best book of the year from the National Academy of Public Administration. His earlier works include "Democracy and Problem Solving: Civic Capacity in Communities across the Globe," (2008) and "The Geography of Opportunity: Race and Housing Choice in Metropolitan America," (2005).
Folder 131: ASL2015-02Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital video file
Item 1: Panel: Marriage and the GOP, February 3, 2015Add to your cart.
Speakers: Meghan McCain, Gregory T. Angelo, Fred Karger, Moderated by Jill Stratton; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: Three pro-marriage equality Republicans will express their views about their party's stance on the subject. McCain, author, media pundit and daughter of Sen. John McCain, is an outspoken ally of the LGBT community; Angelo is the executive director of the Log Cabin Republicans; and Karger is a political consultant, gay-rights activist and the first openly gay presidential candidate. Stratton, associate dean for undergraduate education, will moderate the panel.
Folder 132: ASL2015-03Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Lecture, February 17, 2015Add to your cart.
Speaker: Reza Aslan; Sponsor/Event: WU Foreign Policy Engagement Lecture; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: Aslan is an acclaimed religious scholar and author of several New York Times bestsellers including "Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth." He has appeared frequently in the media to help explain the rising threats of extremist groups such as ISIS, particularly since the Jan. 6 attack on the Charlie Hebdo offices in Paris. As he told CNN's Don Lemon recently: "Europe is facing nothing short of an identity crisis
Folder 133: ASL2015-04Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital video file
Item 1: Lecture, February 18, 2015Add to your cart.
Speaker: Ta-Nehisi Coates; Sponsor/Event: WU Political Review Lecture; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: As national correspondent of The Atlantic, Coates is known for his thought-provoking takes on culture, politics and social issues, and since this summer, he has become better known as the author of the Atlantic cover story, "The Case for Reparations." Coates begins the 15,000-word article with this statement: Two hundred fifty years of slavery. Ninety years of Jim Crow. Sixty years of separate but equal. Thirty-five years of racist housing policy. Until we reckon with our compounding moral debts, America will never be whole.
Folder 134: ASL2015-05Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital video file
Item 1: Celebrating Curiosity - Celebrating Arts & Sciences, February 26, 2015Add to your cart.
Speaker: Radiolab Hosts Jab Abumrad and Robert Krulwich; Sponsor: Arts & Sciences; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: Arts & Sciences at Washington University is a many-splendored thing, and throughout the week of Feb. 23-27, it is hosting "Ampersand Week," offering opportunities to experience the joys of the liberal arts. The week will culminate with a presentation by Abumrad and Krulwich, whose syndicated public radio program Radiolab is a long-running Peabody Award-winning show that explores topics of a scientific and philosophical nature. Their presentation is free, but tickets are required.
Folder 135: ASL2015-06Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT AVAILABLE
Item 1: Ressurecting the Past, March 31, 2015Add to your cart.
Speaker: Beth Shapiro; Location: Emerson Auditorium
Folder 136: ASL2015-07Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT AVAILABLE
Item 1: The Power of Storytelling, April 2, 2015Add to your cart.
Speaker: Levar Burton; Location: Graham Chapel
Folder 137: ASL2015-08Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital video file
Item 1: Reading the Quran at Starbucks: An American Secular Feminist and a Traditional Muslim Scholar Find Commonalities, April 14, 2015Add to your cart.
Speaker: Carla Power; Sponsor/Event: Rabbi Ferdinand Isserman/Phi Beta Kappa Lecture; Location: Umrath Hall Lounge; Notes: For decades, veteran journalist Power has been covering the Middle East, telling stories about its people, traditions, cultures and conflicts. Now, the Time correspondent has written an engrossing account of her yearlong undertaking to learn the Quran, the central religious text of Islam, guided by her madras-trained Muslim friend. The book, If the Oceans Were Ink, reveals what can happen when open-minded people break through stereotypes and misperceptions and search for common ground. This is the Rabbi Ferdinand Isserman/Phi Beta Kappa Lecture. A book-signing will precede the talk at 4 p.m. on April 14.
Folder 138: ASL2015-09Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT AVAILABLE
Item 1: Income and Wealth Inequality, September 16, 2015Add to your cart.

Speaker: Melvin Oliver; Location: Anheuser-Busch Hall, Bryan Cave Moot Courtroom; Notes: Oliver's long and distinguished career has been devoted to understanding and addressing the complex factors that contribute to deep racial disparities in wealth.

He is best known for his pioneering study, together with sociologist Thomas Shapiro, PhD, that revealed the deep divide that exists within our culture that keeps African-Americans from receiving the same opportunities as whites for building wealth. In their research, Oliver and Shapiro make the distinction between "income," defined as a standard of living, and "assets," broadly defined as savings, investments and inheritances that provide opportunities for advancing or enriching a life.

The result of their research was the seminal 1995 book, updated in 2006, called "Black Wealth/White Wealth: A New Perspective on Racial Equality."

Oliver is the SAGE Sara Miller McCune Dean of Social Sciences at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where he also serves as executive dean of the College of Letters and Sciences and as professor of sociology. In addition to his tenure in academia, Oliver, who earned his doctorate in sociology in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in 1977, served for several years as vice president of asset building and community development for the Ford Foundation.

Folder 139: ASL2015-10Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital video file
Item 1: Citizen: An American Lyric, September 21, 2015Add to your cart.
Speaker: Claudia Rankine; Sponsor/Event: First Year Reading Program Lecture; Location: Graham Chapel; Notes: Claudia Rankine's book of prose poetry, "Citizen: An American Lyric," was published last year near the time of Brown's death in Ferguson. Through a combination of essays, poems and images, Rankine ruminates on "micro-racist" moments in life that build up and get stored in the unconscious, creating a compilation of unintentional slights from people who don't recognize their actions as racist, leaving the author (and reader) to figure out how to cope with them. "Citizen" is this year's First Year Reading Program selection for the Class of 2019. The book, recipient of the 2014 National Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry, is a reminder that the "post-racial world" remains a long way off.
Folder 140: ASL2015-11Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Why Universities Should Be in Prisons, September 24, 2015Add to your cart.
Speaker: Rebecca Ginsburg; Event: James E. McLeod Memorial Lecture; Location: Maxine Clark and Bob Fox Forum, Hillman Hall; Notes: By "them," Rebecca Ginsburg, JD, PhD, is referring to prison inmates, and her statement expresses not just something hopeful but the result of everyday experiences. Ginsburg, associate professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, also teaches at the Danville Correctional Center, a medium-high security facility operated by the state of Illinois. While her teaching and research interests are broad, they are united by a common theme of social justice. Since 2006, when she co-founded the Education Justice Project, she has continued to expand the initiative.
Folder 141: ASL2015-12Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Redefining Justice In America, September 25, 2015Add to your cart.

Speaker: John Chisolm and Roland Simpson-Bey; Sponsor/Event: Brown School of Social Work Smart Decarceration Initiative; Location: Edison Theater; Notes: The keynote event for the Brown School's Smart Decarceration Initiative will feature two individuals who are making a positive impact on prison reform.

In 1986, Ronald Simpson-Bey was convicted of assault with intent to murder and was locked away to serve a life sentence. Twenty-four years later, thanks in part to his own legal research, his conviction was overruled. Since being freed, he has worked tirelessly to advance prison reform efforts, most recently through JustLeadershipUSA, an organization with the ambitious goal to halve the nation's correctional population by 2030.

Chisholm

Since being elected in 2007 as district attorney of Milwaukee County in Wisconsin, John Chisholm, JD, has implemented a host of initiatives designed to make the correctional system more fair, more just and more humane. He is committed to helping reverse mass incarceration policies and redress racial inequalities in his community.

Brought together for this program, they will consider what it will take to implement real justice under the law and transform inmates into productive citizens.

Moderating the conversation will be Glenn E. Martin, founder and director of JustLeadershipUSA. A leader in the criminal justice reform movement, Martin is frequently called upon by national news outlets to weigh in on related issues.

Folder 142: ASL2015-13Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT AVAILABLE
Item 1: Visual Attention and Racial Bias in Policing and Criminal Justice, October 9, 2015Add to your cart.
Speaker: Jennifer Eberhardt; Event: Chancellor's Fellows Lecture; Location: Anheuser-Busch Hall, Bryan Cave Moot Courtroom; Notes: Psychologist Jennifer Eberhardt, PhD, associate professor at Stanford University, investigates how subtle racial biases are interpreted in the brain. Her research reveals the extent to which racial imagery, and subsequent judgments based on imagery, suffuse the culture and influence different actions and outcomes for blacks and whites within the criminal justice system. For example, Eberhardt has shown that people jump to negative conclusions when shown black faces vs. white faces, and that having stereotypical black facial features correlates with tougher jury verdicts, longer prison terms, more death sentences and erroneous identifications.
Folder 143: ASL2015-14Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: The Orgasm Debates: How Social and Theoretical Biases Lead Us Astray, October 12, 2015Add to your cart.
Speaker: Elisabeth Lloyd; Event: Thomas Hall History of Science Lecture; Location: TBD; Notes: For decades, scientists have disagreed over the evolutionary purpose of the female orgasm, or whether there is one. In her book, "The Case of the Female Orgasm: Bias in the Science of Evolution," Elisabeth Lloyd, PhD, the Arnold and Maxine Tanis Chair of History and Philosophy of Science at Indiana University Bloomington, examines the existing theories from an objective perspective and presents an argument for the unpopular but scientifically solid theory that the female orgasm has no evolutionary purpose whatsoever.
Folder 144: ASL2015-15Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Can Wolves Laugh? Modernist Laughter in the Magic Theater, October 21, 2015Add to your cart.

Speaker: Anca Parvulescu; Sponsor: Arts & Sciences; Location: Women's Building Formal Lounge; Notes: Anca Parvulescu, PhD, professor of English in Arts & Sciences with a joint appointment with the Interdisciplinary Project in the Humanities (IPH), will use Hermann Hesse's novel, "Der Steppenwolf," as well as a contemporary video installation, to consider the role of laughter in modernity.

In her talk, she will raise the question of whether Hesse's faith in the promise of laughter is a relic of the past or whether it is still available to us as a potential resource.

Her talk is the final of three lectures that comprise this year's Humanities Lecture Series: "Questioning Comedy: Politics, Theater, Laughter." The series opens Oct. 7 with Timothy Moore, PhD, the John and Penelope Biggs Distinguished Professor of Classics, delivering the lecture, "The Paradox of Politics in Ancient Comedy." On Oct. 14, Joseph Loewenstein, PhD, professor of English and director of the IPH, follows with "Shakespeare's Dream of Politics."

Folder 145: ASL2015-16Add to your cart.
Physical Description: LECTURE NOT AVAILABLE
Item 1: The Power of Small Moves, October 29, 2015Add to your cart.
Speaker: Christine Souffrant; Event: Olin Fellows Lecture; Location: Anheuser-Busch Hall, Bryan Cave Moot Courtroom; Notes: When Christine Souffrant, a Haitian immigrant who grew up in a family of street vendors, saw how the earthquake of 2010 had devastated the vending trade, she created a company to digitize the industry and develop a global market. Vendedy, Souffrant's social enterprise, dubbed "EBay meets Etsy for street vendors," makes it easy to access products that are sold on streets and bazaars around the globe.
Folder 146: ASL2015-17Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: Memory and the Sacred: The Holocaust and the Armenian Genocide, November 4, 2015Add to your cart.

Speaker: Jay Winter; Event: Holocaust Memorial Lecture; Location: Umrath Lounge; Notes: "In many ways, (the Armenian genocide) shows that the old idea that war is politics by other means is outdated in the 20th century. War is hatred by other means. And in this case, hatred means extermination. The First World War was the biggest war ever to date. The Second World War was bigger still. It's not an accident in my mind that both of them were marked by genocide. This is the logic of the brutalization of total war."

So states Jay Winter, PhD, the Charles J. Stille Professor of History at Yale University, in the 1997 PBS special, "The Great War and the Shaping of the 20th Century," which he co-created and for which he served as chief historian.

Winter uses his knowledge of 20th-century European history to examine the psychological impact of that history on people and on nations. He is interested in studying how a nation remembers its wars and its repercussions, and how it chooses to memorialize it.

Folder 147: ASL2015-18Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital audio file
Item 1: In the Company of the Poor, November 6, 2015Add to your cart.

Speaker: Paul Farmer; Sponsor/Event: Student Union, GolbeMed Lecture; Location: Anheuser-Busch Hall, Bryan Cave Moot Courtroom; Notes: "The idea that some lives matter less is the root of all that's wrong with the world."

This statement from Paul Farmer, MD, PhD, the Kolokotrones University Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard University, serves as shorthand for the mission statement of Partners In Health, the organization he helped found three decades ago to advance the belief that health is a human right.

With a growing team of health-care professionals, volunteers and donors, Farmer is spreading his philosophy of social justice and quality medical care to the most destitute parts of the world.

Folder 148: ASL2015-19Add to your cart.
Physical Description: digital video file
Item 1: Truth in Writing, November 9, 2015Add to your cart.

Speaker: Meghan Daum; Sponsor/Event: Woman's Club of WU Lecture; Location: TBA; Notes: Meghan Daum writes about serious matters, but that doesn't mean her novels, essays and columns cover only depressing topics. Rather, they cover real life - the heartbreak and the humor - in all its complicated glory.

In her newest collection, "The Unspeakable," for example, she writes about her feelings of kinship with lesbians, how it feels to live through a life-threatening illness, and the love of a good dog. She uses moments from her life to explore broader issues of the day in a new or different way, but always with respect for the truth.


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